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Pamela Campa

Personal Details

First Name:Pamela
Middle Name:
Last Name:Campa
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca718
http://econ.ucalgary.ca/profiles/pamela-campa

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Calgary

Calgary, Canada
http://econ.ucalgary.ca/

: (403) 220-5857
(403) 282-5262
2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4
RePEc:edi:declgca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bagues, Manuel & Campa, Pamela, 2017. "Can Gender Quotas in Candidate Lists Empower Women? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," CEPR Discussion Papers 12149, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Pamela Campa & Michel Serafinelli, 2016. "Politico-Economic Regimes And Attitudes: Female Workers Under State-Socialism Abstract: This paper investigates the extent to which attitudes are affected by political regimes and government policies.," Working Papers 089, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  3. Pamela Campa & Michel Serafinelli, 2015. "Politico-economic Regimes and Attitudes: Female Workers under State-socialism," Working Papers tecipa-553, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  4. Pamela Campa & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta, 2009. "Gender Culture and Gender Gap in Employment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2738, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Pamela Campa, "undated". "Press and Leaks: Do Newspapers Reduce Toxic Emissions?," Working Papers 2015-10, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 01 Jul 2015.

Articles

  1. Pamela Campa & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta, 2011. "Gender Culture and Gender Gap in Employment," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 156-182, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bagues, Manuel & Campa, Pamela, 2017. "Can Gender Quotas in Candidate Lists Empower Women? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," CEPR Discussion Papers 12149, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Laura Hospido & Carlos Sanz, 2019. "Gender gaps in the evaluation of research: evidence from submissions to economics conferences," Working Papers 1918, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    2. Eva Ranehill & Roberto A. Weber, 2017. "Do gender preference gaps impact policy outcomes?," ECON - Working Papers 271, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Martín Gonzalez-Eiras & Carlos Sanz, 2018. "Women’s representation in politics: voter bias, party bias, and electoral systems," Working Papers 1834, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    4. Maria Teresa Balaguer-Coll & Mariya Ivanova-Toneva, 2019. "The impact women's leadership in local Governments: The case of Spain," Working Papers 2019/05, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    5. Audinga Baltrunaite & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta & Giulia Savio, 2016. "Let the Voters Choose Women," CESifo Working Paper Series 5693, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Thomas Fujiwara & Carlos Sanz, 2017. "Norms in Bargaining: Evidence from Government Formation in Spain," NBER Working Papers 24137, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Le Barbanchon, Thomas & Sauvagnat, Julien, 2018. "Voter Bias and Women in Politics," CEPR Discussion Papers 13238, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Joaquín Galeno & Francisco Gallego & Felipe González, 2019. "¿Candidatas o espectadoras? Un análisis del impacto de la ley de cuotas," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(154), pages 7-41.
    9. Eva Ranehill & Roberto A. Weber, 2017. "Do Gender Preference Gaps Impact Policy Outcomes?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6776, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Ascensión Andina-Díaz & Paula Penalva-Planelles & M. Socorro Puy, 2019. "Women’s preferences for social spending: theory and evidence from Spanish political representatives," Working Papers 2019-02, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.

  2. Pamela Campa & Michel Serafinelli, 2016. "Politico-Economic Regimes And Attitudes: Female Workers Under State-Socialism Abstract: This paper investigates the extent to which attitudes are affected by political regimes and government policies.," Working Papers 089, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

    Cited by:

    1. Paola Giuliano, 2017. "Gender: An Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 23635, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Beblo, Miriam & Görges, Luise, 2018. "On the nature of nurture. The malleability of gender differences in work preferences," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 19-41.

  3. Pamela Campa & Michel Serafinelli, 2015. "Politico-economic Regimes and Attitudes: Female Workers under State-socialism," Working Papers tecipa-553, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Quentin Lippmann & Claudia Senik, 2018. "Math, Girls and Socialism," PSE Working Papers halshs-01387272, HAL.
    2. Helmut Rainer & Clara Albrecht & Stefan Bauernschuster & Anita Fichtl & Timo Hener & Joachim Ragnitz, 2018. "Deutschland 2017 - Studie zu den Einstellungen und Verhaltensweisen der Bürgerinnen und Bürger im vereinigten Deutschland," ifo Forschungsberichte, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 96, October.
    3. Perugini, Cristiano & Vladisavljević, Marko, 2019. "Gender inequality and the gender-job satisfaction paradox in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 129-147.
    4. Steinhauer, Andreas, 2018. "Working Moms, Childlessness, and Female Identity," CEPR Discussion Papers 12929, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Quentin Lippmann & Alexandre Georgieff & Claudia Senik, 2019. "Undoing Gender with Institutions. Lessons from the German Division and Reunification," Working Papers halshs-01297653, HAL.
    6. Andreas Steinhauer, 2018. "Working Moms, Childlessness, and Female Identity," Sciences Po publications 79, Sciences Po.
    7. Alzbeta Mullerova, 2017. "Workers or mothers? Czech welfare and gender role preferences in transition," EconomiX Working Papers 2017-6, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    8. Louise Grogan & Fraser Summerfield, 2014. "Government Transfers, Work and Occupational Identity: Evidence from the Russian Old-Age Pension," Working Paper series 22_14, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    9. Findeisen, Sebastian & Dauth, Wolfgang & Lee, Tim, 2016. "Human Capital Accumulation over the Life-Cycle: Evidence from Germany’s Reunification," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145887, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Quentin Lippmann & Alexandre Georgieff & Claudia Senik, 2019. "Undoing Gender with Institutions. Lessons from the German Division and Reunification," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1031, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. Paola Giuliano, 2017. "Gender: An Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 23635, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Michael Wyrwich, 2017. "Woman and the labour market in East and West Germany: Socialist legacy and pre-socialist tradition," Jena Economic Research Papers 2017-015, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    13. Bau, Natalie, 2019. "Can Policy Change Culture? Government Pension Plans and Traditional Kinship Practices," CEPR Discussion Papers 13486, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  4. Pamela Campa & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta, 2009. "Gender Culture and Gender Gap in Employment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2738, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Natalia Soboleva, 2014. "Gender Attitudes In The World Of Work: Cross-Cultural Comparison," HSE Working papers WP BRP 46/SOC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Cilja Harders, 2013. "Engendering peace, conflict and violence," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 32, pages 522-541, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance
      [Trabajo & familia : mujeres de América Latina y el Caribe en busca de un nuevo equilibrio - Resumen ejecuivo (Vol. 2
      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.

  5. Pamela Campa, "undated". "Press and Leaks: Do Newspapers Reduce Toxic Emissions?," Working Papers 2015-10, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 01 Jul 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Boffa, Federico & Piolatto, Amedeo & Ponzetto, Giacomo AM, 2013. "Centralization and Accountability: Theory and Evidence from the Clean Air Act," CEPR Discussion Papers 9514, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Pamela Campa & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta, 2011. "Gender Culture and Gender Gap in Employment," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 156-182, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Piazzalunga, Daniela, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap among College Graduates in Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 11045, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Mirco Tonin & Jackline Wahba, 2014. "The Sources of the Gender Gap in Economics Enrolment," CESifo Working Paper Series 4957, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Graziella Bertocchi & Monica Bozzano, 2012. "Women, Medieval Commerce, and the Education Gender Gap," CHILD Working Papers Series 10, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    4. Michela Carlana, 2019. "Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(3), pages 1163-1224.
    5. Gradstein, Mark, 2019. "Misallocation of talent and human capital: Political economy analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 148-157.
    6. Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato & Francesco Billari, 2015. "Information and Women's Intentions: Experimental Evidence about Child Care," Working Papers 075, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    7. Monica Bozzano, 2015. "On the Historical Roots of Women’s Empowerment across Italian Provinces: Religion or Family Culture?," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 110, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    8. Audinga Baltrunaite & Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta, 2014. "Spill-over Effects of Affirmative Action: Political Representation and the Power of the Elderly," CESifo Working Paper Series 4955, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Ye, Bing & Zhao, Yucong, 2018. "Women hold up half the sky? Gender identity and the wife's labor market performance in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 116-141.
    10. Michael Funke & Yu-Fu Chen, 2010. "Booms, recessions and financial turmoil: A fresh look at investment decisions under cyclical uncertainty," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 21007, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
    11. Helena Marques, 2017. "Gender, entrepreneurship and development: which policies matter?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 35(2), pages 197-228, January.
    12. Natalia Soboleva, 2014. "Gender Attitudes In The World Of Work: Cross-Cultural Comparison," HSE Working papers WP BRP 46/SOC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    13. Bachmann, Ronald & Bechara, Peggy & Cim, Merve & Kramer, Anica, 2018. "Working women and labour market inequality. Research project for the Wilfried Martens Centre for European Studies: Final report - July 2018," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 195939.
    14. Rainald Borck, 2014. "Adieu Rabenmutter—culture, fertility, female labour supply, the gender wage gap and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 739-765, July.
    15. Monica Bozzano, 2012. "Assessing Gender Inequality among Italian Regions: The Italian Gender Gap Index," Quaderni di Dipartimento 174, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    16. Maria Alessandra Antonelli & Veronica Grembi, 2014. "Central Targets and local Agendas: Missing Lisbon 2010," Public Finance Research Papers 6, Istituto di Economia e Finanza, DIGEF, Sapienza University of Rome.
    17. Mirco Tonin & Jackline Wahba, 2015. "The Sources of the Gender Gap in Economics Enrolment," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(1), pages 72-94.
    18. Gradstein, Mark, 2019. "Misallocation of Talent and Human Capital: Political Economy Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 13574, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    19. Paola Profeta & Eleanor Woodhouse, 2018. "Do Electoral Rules Matter for Female Representation?," Working Papers 121, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    20. Paola Profeta & Eleanor Woodhouse, 2018. "Do Electoral Rules Matter for Female Representation?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7101, CESifo Group Munich.
    21. John Anyanwu, 2013. "Characteristics and Macroeconomic Determinants of Youth Employment in Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(2), pages 107-129.
    22. Marco Caliendo & Frank Fossen & Alexander Kritikos & Miriam Wetter, 2014. "The Gender Gap in Entrepreneurship: Not Just a Matter of Personality," CESifo Working Paper Series 4803, CESifo Group Munich.
    23. John C. Anyanwu, 2016. "Analysis of Gender Equality in Youth Employment in Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(4), pages 397-415, December.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2015-12-01 2016-06-25 2017-07-23
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2015-12-01 2016-06-25 2017-07-30
  3. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (2) 2017-07-23 2017-07-30
  4. NEP-GEN: Gender (2) 2017-07-23 2017-07-30
  5. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (2) 2015-12-01 2016-06-25
  6. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2017-07-23
  7. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2017-07-30
  8. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2015-07-11
  9. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2015-07-11
  10. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2017-07-23
  11. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2016-06-25
  12. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (1) 2015-07-11

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