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Randy Albelda

Personal Details

First Name:Randy
Middle Name:Pearl
Last Name:Albelda
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pal680
Terminal Degree:1983 Department of Economics; University of Massachusetts-Amherst (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
University of Massachusetts-Boston

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/economics/
RePEc:edi:deumbus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Randy Albelda & Aimee Bell-Pasht & Charalampos Konstantinidis, 2019. "Gender and Precarious Work in the United States: Evidence from the Contingent Work Supplement 1995-2017," Working Papers 2019-01, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
  2. Randy Albelda & Michael Carr, 2017. "One Step Forward, One Step Back? Labor Supply Effects of Minimum Wage Increases on Single Parents with Public Child Care Support," Working Papers 2017_01, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
  3. Randy Albelda & Diana Salas Coronado, 2014. "Expanding Women's Healthcare Access in the United States: The Patchwork “Universalism†of the Affordable Care Act," Working Papers 2014_02, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.

Articles

  1. Randy Albelda & Michael Carr, 2014. "Double Trouble: US Low-Wage and Low-Income Workers, 1979-2011," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 1-28, April.
  2. Randy Albelda, 2011. "Time Binds: US Antipoverty Policies, Poverty, and the Well-Being of Single Mothers," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 189-214, October.
  3. Randy Albelda, 2010. "The Gloves‐Off Economy: Workplace Standards at the Bottom of America's Labor Market – Edited by Annette Bernhardt, Heather Boushey, Laura Dresser and Chris Tilly," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 222-224, March.
  4. Randy Albelda, 2010. "Public Policy for Women: The State, Income Security, and Labour Market Issues," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 218-222.
  5. Randy Albelda, 2007. "Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 137-141.
  6. Randy Albelda & Susan Himmelweit & Jane Humphries, 2004. "The Dilemmas Of Lone Motherhood: Key Issues For Feminist Economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 1-7.
  7. Susan Himmelweit & Barbara Bergmann & Kate Green & Randy Albelda & the Women's Committee of One Hundred & Charlotte Koren, 2004. "Lone Mothers: What is to be done?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 237-264.
  8. Randy Albelda, 2001. "Welfare-to-Work, Farewell to Families? US Welfare Reform and Work/Family Debates," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 119-135.
  9. Albelda, Randy, 1999. "Women and poverty: Beyond earnings and welfare," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 723-742.
  10. Randy Albelda, 1995. "Introduction: The welfare reform debate you wish would happen," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 81-83.
  11. Randy albelda, 1985. ""Nice Work If You Can Get It": Segmentation of White and Black Women Workers in the Post-War Period," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 72-85, September.
  12. Aldrich, Mark & Albelda, Randy, 1980. "Determinants of working women's wages during the progressive era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 323-341, October.

Chapters

  1. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Comment on Darity, McCrate, and Wicks-Lim," Chapters, in: Jeannette Wicks-Lim & Robert Pollin (ed.), Capitalism on Trial, chapter 17, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  2. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Low-wage mothers on the edge in the US," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 16, pages 257-272, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Randy Albelda, 2011. "Time Binds: US Antipoverty Policies, Poverty, and the Well-Being of Single Mothers," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 189-214, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Low-wage mothers on the edge in the US," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 16, pages 257-272, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Randy Albelda & Diana Salas Coronado, 2014. "Expanding Women's Healthcare Access in the United States: The Patchwork “Universalism†of the Affordable Care Act," Working Papers 2014_02, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    3. Marilyn Power, 2013. "A social provisioning approach to gender and economic life," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 1, pages 7-17, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Randy Albelda & Michael Carr, 2017. "One Step Forward, One Step Back? Labor Supply Effects of Minimum Wage Increases on Single Parents with Public Child Care Support," Working Papers 2017_01, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    5. Nancy Folbre & Marta Murray-Close & Jooyeoun Suh, 2018. "Equivalence scales for extended income in the U.S," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 189-227, June.

  2. Randy Albelda & Susan Himmelweit & Jane Humphries, 2004. "The Dilemmas Of Lone Motherhood: Key Issues For Feminist Economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 1-7.

    Cited by:

    1. Francesca Fiori, 2020. "Maternal employment and the well-being of children living with a lone mother in Scotland," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 43(57), pages 1685-1738.
    2. Kanchana Ruwanpura, 2009. "Gender, Generation and Poverty: Exploring the 'Feminisation of Poverty' in Africa, Asia and Latin America," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 158-163.
    3. Ai-Thu Dang & Jean-Marie Monnier, 2011. "Gender Regimes and Welfare States in France: A historical perspective," EconomiX Working Papers 2011-40, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.

  3. Randy Albelda, 2001. "Welfare-to-Work, Farewell to Families? US Welfare Reform and Work/Family Debates," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 119-135.

    Cited by:

    1. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Low-wage mothers on the edge in the US," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 16, pages 257-272, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Drucilla K. Barker, 2013. "Feminist economics as a theory and method," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 2, pages 18-31, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Ramya Vijaya, 2007. "Trade, Job Losses and Gender: A Policy Perspective," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 73-85, October.
    4. Ramya Vijaya, 2007. "Trade, Job Losses and Gender: A Policy Perspective," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 73-85, January.

  4. Albelda, Randy, 1999. "Women and poverty: Beyond earnings and welfare," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 723-742.

    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Gradin & Coral del Rio & Olga Canto, 2010. "Gender Wage Discrimination and Poverty in the EU," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 73-109.
    2. Elena Bárcena-Martín & Ana I. Moro Egido, 2013. "Country differences in the gender effect on poverty in Europe," ThE Papers 13/02, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    3. Dorabawila, Vajeera & DuMont, Kimberly & Mitchell-Herzfeld, Susan, 2012. "A method for estimating child poverty rates, projections for the short-term and the relationship between child poverty and child care subsidy receipt at the county level," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 466-473.
    4. Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó & Coral del Río, 2006. "Poverty and Women’s Labor Market Activity: the Role of Gender Wage Discrimination in the EU," Working Papers 40, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

  5. Randy albelda, 1985. ""Nice Work If You Can Get It": Segmentation of White and Black Women Workers in the Post-War Period," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 72-85, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Jane Lapidus & Deborah Figart, 1998. "Remedying "Unfair Acts": U.S. Pay Equity by Race and Gender," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 7-28.
    2. Randy Albelda & Aimee Bell-Pasht & Charalampos Konstantinidis, 2020. "Gender and Precarious Work in the United States: Evidence from the Contingent Work Supplement 1995–2017," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 52(3), pages 542-563, September.
    3. Randy Albelda & Aimee Bell-Pasht & Charalampos Konstantinidis, 2019. "Gender and Precarious Work in the United States: Evidence from the Contingent Work Supplement 1995-2017," Working Papers 2019-01, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.

  6. Aldrich, Mark & Albelda, Randy, 1980. "Determinants of working women's wages during the progressive era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 323-341, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Masaki Nakabayashi, 2013. "Price, quality, and organisation: branding in the Japanese silk-reeling industry from the 1880s to the 1900s," Working Papers 13024, Economic History Society.
    2. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2012. "Price, Quality, and Organization: Branding in the Japanese silk-reeling industry," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f160, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 07 Jan 2013.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2020-02-17
  2. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2020-02-17

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