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Maria Manuel Pinho

Personal Details

First Name:Maria
Middle Name:Manuel
Last Name:Pinho
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi35

Affiliation

Faculdade de Economia
Universidade do Porto

Porto, Portugal
http://www.fep.up.pt/
RePEc:edi:fepuppt (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Maria Manuel Pinho, 2008. "The political economy of public spending composition: evidence from a panel of OECD countries," FEP Working Papers 295, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  2. Maria Manuel Pinho, 2004. "Political models of budget deficits: a literature review," FEP Working Papers 138, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  3. Maria Manuel Pinho & Linda Veiga, 2004. "The Determinants of Intergovernmental Grants in Portugal: a Public Choice Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa04p192, European Regional Science Association.

Articles

  1. Manuel Correia de Pinho & Maria Manuel Pinho, 2017. "Esforço fiscal em Portugal: uma avaliação no período 1995-2015," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 44, pages 25-46, July.
  2. Linda Veiga & Maria Pinho, 2007. "The political economy of intergovernmental grants: Evidence from a maturing democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(3), pages 457-477, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Maria Manuel Pinho, 2008. "The political economy of public spending composition: evidence from a panel of OECD countries," FEP Working Papers 295, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    Cited by:

    1. Abel Costa Fernandes, 2009. "Explaining Government Spending: a Cointegration Approach," FEP Working Papers 311, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

  2. Maria Manuel Pinho, 2004. "Political models of budget deficits: a literature review," FEP Working Papers 138, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    Cited by:

    1. Eisl, Andreas, 2017. "Explaining variation in public debt: A quantitative analysis of the effects of governance," MaxPo Discussion Paper Series 17/1, Max Planck Sciences Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Societies (MaxPo).
    2. Hakan HOTUNLUOĞLU & Recep TEKELİ, 2013. "Budget Deficits and Democracy: The Case of Turkey," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 19(19).
    3. Andreas Eisl, 2017. "Explaining Variation in Public Debt: A Quantitative Analysis of the Effects of Governance," Sciences Po publications 17/1, Sciences Po.
    4. Robert Lavigne, 2006. "The Institutional and Political Determinants of Fiscal Adjustment," Staff Working Papers 06-1, Bank of Canada.
    5. Lavigne, Robert, 2011. "The political and institutional determinants of fiscal adjustment: Entering and exiting fiscal distress," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 17-35, March.
    6. Salih BARIŞIK & Abdullah BARIS, 2017. "Impact of governance on budget deficit in developing countries," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(611), S), pages 111-130, Summer.
    7. Florian Chatagny & Nils Soguel, 2012. "The effect of tax revenue budgeting errors on fiscal balance: evidence from the Swiss cantons," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 19(3), pages 319-337, June.
    8. Andreas Eisl, 2017. "Explaining Variation in Public Debt," Working Papers hal-02187805, HAL.

  3. Maria Manuel Pinho & Linda Veiga, 2004. "The Determinants of Intergovernmental Grants in Portugal: a Public Choice Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa04p192, European Regional Science Association.

    Cited by:

    1. João Silva Moura Neto & Nelson Marconi & Paulo Eduardo Moledo Palombo & Paulo Roberto Arvate, 2006. "Vertical Transfers And The Appropriation Of Resources By The Bureaucracy: The Case Of Brazilian State Governments," Anais do XXXIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 34th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 136, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

Articles

  1. Linda Veiga & Maria Pinho, 2007. "The political economy of intergovernmental grants: Evidence from a maturing democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(3), pages 457-477, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Dubois, 2016. "Political business cycles 40 years after Nordhaus," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 166(1), pages 235-259, January.
    2. Cruz, Tassia & Silva, Talita, 2020. "Minimum Spending in Education and the Flypaper Effect," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).
    3. Pablo Garofalo & Daniel Lema & Jorge M. Streb, 2020. "Political budget cycles and voting within a federal country: The influence of political alignment," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 305-334, July.
    4. Linda Gonçalves Veiga & Francisco José Veiga, 2010. "Intergovernmental fiscal transfers as pork barrel," NIPE Working Papers 7/2010, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    5. Paola Azar Dufrechou, 2018. "Electoral politics and the diffusion of primary schooling: evidence from Uruguay, 1914-1954," Working Papers wpdea1801, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    6. Maffioli, Elisa M., 2021. "The political economy of health epidemics: Evidence from the Ebola outbreak," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    7. Fabio Fiorillo & Elvina Merkaj, 2021. "A comprehensive approach to intergovernmental grants’ tactical allocation. Theory and estimation guidelines," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 28(4), pages 995-1013, August.
    8. Vítor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2015. "Budget, expenditures composition and political manipulation: Evidence from Portugal," GEMF Working Papers 2015-13, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    9. Gonschorek, Gerrit J. & Schulze, Günther G. & Sjahrir, Bambang Suharnoko, 2018. "To the ones in need or the ones you need? The political economy of central discretionary grants − empirical evidence from Indonesia," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 240-260.
    10. Atsuyoshi Morozumi & Francisco José Veiga & Linda Gonçalves Veiga, 2014. "Electoral effects on the composition of public spending and revenue: evidence from a large panel of countries," NIPE Working Papers 23/2014, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    11. Pablo Garofalo & Daniel Lema & Jorge M. Streb, 2016. "Party alignment, political budget cycles and vote within a federal country," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 601, Universidad del CEMA, revised May 2017.
    12. Padovano, Fabio, 2012. "The drivers of interregional policy choices: Evidence from Italy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 324-340.
    13. Zudenkova, Galina, 2011. "A political agency model of coattail voting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1652-1660.
    14. Helmut Herwartz & Bernd Theilen, 2014. "On the political and fiscal determinants of income redistribution under federalism and democracy: evidence from Germany," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 121-139, April.
    15. Livert, Felipe & Gainza, Xabier & Acuña, Jose, 2019. "Paving the electoral way: Urban infrastructure, partisan politics and civic engagement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 1-1.
    16. Das, Ritanjan & Dey, Subhasish & Neogi, Ranjita, 2021. "Across the stolen Ponds: The political geography of social welfare in rural eastern India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 146(C).
    17. Emilie CALDEIRA, 2011. "Does the system of allocation of intergovernmental transfers in Senegal eliminate politically motivated targeting?," Working Papers 201105, CERDI.
    18. Sergio Naruhiko Sakurai & Maria Isabel Accoroni Theodoro, 2020. "On the relationship between political alignment and government transfers: triple differences evidence from a developing country," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 58(3), pages 1107-1141, March.
    19. Diloá Athias & Rodrigo Schneider, 2021. "The impact of political representation on the provision of public goods and services," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 42(2), pages 367-381, June.
    20. Levoshko, Tamila, 2017. ""Pork-Barrel"-Politik und das regionale Wirtschaftswachstum. Empirische Evidenz für die Ukraine und Polen," Working Papers 0642, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    21. Andres Felipe Muñoz & Gustavo Axel Radics & Claudia Bone, 2016. "Subnational Fiscal Disparities and Intergovermental Transfers in LAC," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 219(4), pages 35-66, December.
    22. Anastasios Kitsos & Antonios Proestakis, 2021. "Mediating distributive politics: political alignment and electoral business cycle effects on municipality financing in Greece," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 67(1), pages 1-26, August.
    23. V�tor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2016. "Are there political cycles hidden inside government expenditures?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 34-37, January.
    24. Maria EL KHDARI, 2015. "Déterminants des transferts intergouvernementaux : le cas des communes Marocaines," Working Papers 201531, CERDI.
    25. Furdas, Marina & Homolkova, Katerina & Kis-Katos, Krisztina, 2015. "Local Political Budget Cycles in a Federation: Evidence from West German Cities," IZA Discussion Papers 8798, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    26. Abel Fumey & Festus O. Egwaikhide, 2018. "Political Economy of Intergovernmental Fiscal Transfers: The Rural‐Urban Dynamics in Ghana," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 30(1), pages 33-44, March.
    27. Lopes da Fonseca, Mariana, 2017. "Political determinants of municipal accounts: Quasi-experimental evidence from Portugal," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 238, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    28. Jakob Haan & Jeroen Klomp, 2013. "Conditional political budget cycles: a review of recent evidence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(3), pages 387-410, December.
    29. Linda Gonçalves Veiga, 2010. "Determinants of the assignment of E.U. funds to Portuguese municipalities," NIPE Working Papers 11/2010, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    30. Xin Wan & Yuanyuan Ma & Kezhong Zhang, 2015. "Political determinants of intergovernmental transfers in a regionally decentralized authoritarian regime: evidence from China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(27), pages 2803-2820, June.
    31. Harry Pickard, 2018. "Does Congressional experience in US governors influence state transfers?," Working Papers 2018014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    32. Maria El Khdari, 2019. "Déterminants Des Transferts Intergouvernementaux : Le Cas Du Maroc," Post-Print hal-02137651, HAL.
    33. Kauder, Björn & Björn, Kauder & Niklas, Potrafke & Markus, Reischmann, 2016. "Do politicians gratify core supporters? Evidence from a discretionary grant program," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145509, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    34. Bruno T. Rocha & Nuno Afonso & Patrícia C. Melo & João de Abreu e Silva, 2021. "What drives the allocation of motorways? Evidence from Portugal’s fast-expanding network," Working Papers REM 2021/0184, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
    35. Kayode Taiwo & Linda G. Veiga, 2020. "Is there an “invisible hand” in the formula-based intergovernmental transfers in Nigeria?," NIPE Working Papers 02/2020, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    36. Eric Dubois, 2016. "Political Business Cycles 40 Years after Nordhaus," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01291401, HAL.
    37. Bhavnani, Rikhil R. & Lacina, Bethany, 2017. "Fiscal Federalism at Work? Central Responses to Internal Migration in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 236-248.
    38. Linda Gonçalves Veiga & Francisco veiga, 2016. "Term limits at the local government level," NIPE Working Papers 7/2016, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    39. Maria Manuel Pinho, 2008. "The political economy of public spending composition: evidence from a panel of OECD countries," FEP Working Papers 295, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    40. Eric Dubois, 2016. "Political Business Cycles 40 Years after Nordhaus," Post-Print hal-01291401, HAL.
    41. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke & Markus Reischmann, 2016. "Do Politicians Reward Core Supporters? Evidence from a Discretionary Grant Program," CESifo Working Paper Series 6097, CESifo.
    42. Markus Reischmann, 2016. "Empirische Studien zu Staatsverschuldung und fiskalischen Transferzahlungen," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 63.
    43. Israel Garcia & Bernd Hayo, 2020. "Political Budget Cycles Revisited: Testing the Signalling Process," MAGKS Papers on Economics 202014, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    44. Paulo Roberto Arvate & George Avelino & José A. Tavares, 2007. "Budget Deficits And Reelection Prospects: Voters As Fiscal Conservatives In A New Democracy," Anais do XXXV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 35th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 106, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    45. Josip Glaurdić & Vuk Vuković, 2017. "Granting votes: exposing the political bias of intergovernmental grants using the within-between specification for panel data," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 171(1), pages 223-241, April.
    46. Abel Fumey, 2018. "Intergovernmental fiscal transfers and tactical political maneuverings: Evidence from Ghana's District Assemblies Common Fund," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-31, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    47. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Do formula-based intergovernmental transfer mechanisms eliminate politically motivated targeting? Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 380-390, November.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations, Wikipedia, or ReplicationWiki entries:
  1. Portuguese Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2004-07-26 2005-11-09 2008-10-13
  2. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2005-11-09 2008-10-13
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2008-10-13
  4. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2005-11-09
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2004-07-26
  6. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2004-07-26
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2005-11-09

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