IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/paz82.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Yoshiaki Azuma

Personal Details

First Name:Yoshiaki
Middle Name:
Last Name:Azuma
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:paz82
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2002 Economics Department; Brown University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(80%) Department of Economics
Doshisha University

Kyoto, Japan
http://www.econ.doshisha.ac.jp/

:


RePEc:edi:dedosjp (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Economics Department
Brown University

Providence, Rhode Island (United States)
http://www.econ.brown.edu/

:


RePEc:edi:edbrous (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Azuma, Yoshiaki, 2010. "How career changes affect technological breakthrough - Reconsidering the prolonged slump of the Japanese economy -," MPRA Paper 62582, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Azuma, Yoshiaki & Nakao, Takeo, 2009. "Why the saving rate has been falling in Japan," MPRA Paper 62581, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2002. "A Theory of the Informal Sector," NBER Working Papers 8823, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2001. "Educational Inequality," NBER Working Papers 8206, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2008. "A Theory Of The Informal Sector," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 62-79, March.
  2. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2003. "Educational Inequality," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 317-335, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2002. "A Theory of the Informal Sector," NBER Working Papers 8823, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Santiago Sanchez-Pages & Stephane Straub, 2006. "The Emergence of Institutions," ESE Discussion Papers 148, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    2. Olaf J. de Groot & Matthew D. Rablen & Anja Shortland, 2011. "Gov-aargh-nance: "Even Criminals Need Law and Order"," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 46, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Klaus Jaffe & Sary Levy Carciente & Wladimir Zanoni, 2007. "The Economic Limits Of Trust: The Case Of A Latin-American Urban Informal Commerce Sector," Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 12(03), pages 339-352.
    4. Titas Kumar Bandopadhyay, 2007. "Trade Reform, Capital Mobility, and Efficiency Wage in a Harris-Todaro Economy," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 46(2), pages 163-174.
    5. Prado, Mauricio, 2011. "Government policy in the formal and informal sectors," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1120-1136.
    6. Olaf J. de Groot & Anja Shortland, 2010. "Gov-arrrgh-nance: Jolly Rogers and Dodgy Rulers," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 39, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Dario Cziraky & Max Gillman, 2004. "Inflation and Endogenous Growth in Underground Economies," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 50, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    8. D’Hernoncourt, Johanna & Méon, Pierre-Guillaume, 2012. "The not so dark side of trust: Does trust increase the size of the shadow economy?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 97-121.
    9. Gabriela Inchauste & Mark Gradstein & Era Dabla-Norris, 2005. "What Causes Firms to Hide Output? the Determinants of Informality," IMF Working Papers 05/160, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Gary A. Dymski, 2013. "The Crisis of the Core Seen through the Eyes of the Periphery: A Schelling Model of the Global-South Megacity and the European Crisis," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(4), pages 433-455, June.
    11. Straub, Stéphane, 2005. "Informal sector: The credit market channel," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 299-321, December.
    12. Antunes, Antonio R. & Cavalcanti, Tiago V. de V., 2007. "Start up costs, limited enforcement, and the hidden economy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 203-224, January.
    13. Gatti, Roberta & Honorati, Maddalena, 2007. "Informality among Formal Firms: Firm-level, Cross-country Evidence on Tax Compliance and Access to Credit," CEPR Discussion Papers 6597, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  2. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2001. "Educational Inequality," NBER Working Papers 8206, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Crifo, Patricia, 2008. "Skill supply and biased technical change," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 812-830, October.
    2. Linda Loubert, 2005. "Discrimination in education financing," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 17-27, March.
    3. Cecilia Garcia-Penalosa & Campbell leith & Chol-Won Li, 2001. "Wage Inequality and the Effort Incentive Effects of Technical Progress," Working Papers 2001_14, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.

Articles

  1. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2008. "A Theory Of The Informal Sector," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 62-79, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Yoshiaki Azuma & Herschel I. Grossman, 2003. "Educational Inequality," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 317-335, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2001-04-02
  2. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2002-04-03
  3. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2002-04-15
  4. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2002-04-15

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Yoshiaki Azuma should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.