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FAIRLIE: Stata module to generate nonlinear decomposition of binary outcome differentials

Author

Listed:
  • Ben Jann

    (University of Bern)

Programming Language

Stata

Abstract

fairlie computes the nonlinear decomposition of binary outcome differentials proposed by Fairlie (1999, 2003).

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Jann, 2006. "FAIRLIE: Stata module to generate nonlinear decomposition of binary outcome differentials," Statistical Software Components S456727, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 26 May 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:boc:bocode:s456727
    Note: This module should be installed from within Stata by typing "ssc install fairlie". The module is made available under terms of the GPL v3 (https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.txt). Windows users should not attempt to download these files with a web browser.
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    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/f/fairlie.ado
    File Function: program code
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/f/fairlie.hlp
    File Function: help file
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/h/homecomp.dta
    File Function: sample data file
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/f/fairlie.zip
    File Function: zipped contents
    Download Restriction: no
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bhalotra, Sonia & Valente, Christine & van Soest, Arthur, 2010. "The puzzle of Muslim advantage in child survival in India," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 191-204, March.
    2. Claus Schnabel & Joachim Wagner, 2007. "The Persistent Decline in Unionization in Western and Eastern Germany, 1980-2004 - What Can We Learn from a Decomposition Analysis?," Industrielle Beziehungen - Zeitschrift fuer Arbeit, Organisation und Management - The German Journal of Industrial Relations, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 14(2), pages 118-132.
    3. Jaan Masso & Tõnu Roolaht & Urmas Varblane, 2010. "Foreign Direct Investment And Innovation In Central And Eastern Europe: Evidence From Estonia," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 67, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    4. Francesco Pastore & Sarosh Sattar & Erwin Tiongson, 2013. "Gender differences in earnings and labor supply in early career: evidence from Kosovo’s school-to-work transition survey," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-34, December.
    5. Nils Braakmann, 2009. "The Role of Psychological Traits for the Gender Gap in Full-Time Employment and Wages: Evidence from Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 162, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. John T. Addison & Alex Bryson & Paulino Teixeira & André Pahnke, 2011. "Slip Sliding Away: Further Union Decline In Germany And Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 58(4), pages 490-518, September.
    7. Claudia Piras & Andrea Filippo Presbitero & Roberta Rabellotti, 2013. "Definitions Matter: Measuring Gender Gaps in Firms' Access to Credit," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 90, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    8. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2010. "Gender Gap in Dropping out of High School: Evidence from the Canadian NLSCY Youth," Cahiers de recherche 1044, CIRPEE.
    9. Görlitz Katja, 2010. "The Development of Employers’ Training Investments Over Time – A Decomposition Analysis Using German Establishment Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 230(2), pages 186-207, April.

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