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Disentangling occupational and health paths: employment, working conditions and health interactions

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  • Thomas Barnay

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Suggested Citation

  • Éric Defebvre, 2017. "Disentangling occupational and health paths: employment, working conditions and health interactions," Erudite Ph.D Dissertations, Erudite, number ph17-04 edited by Thomas Barnay, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eru:erudph:ph17-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 766-817, June.
    2. Zhang, Xiaohui & Zhao, Xueyan & Harris, Anthony, 2009. "Chronic diseases and labour force participation in Australia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 91-108, January.
    3. Daniel Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2009. "Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Using Administrative Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1265-1306.
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