IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wsi/serxxx/v54y2009i04ns0217590809003483.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Decriminalization Policy And Marijuana Smoking Prevalence: A Look At The Literature

Author

Listed:
  • KANNIKA DAMRONGPLASIT

    (Division of Economics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore;
    Department of Health Services University of California, Los Angeles, USA;
    Rand Corportation, USA)

  • CHENG HSIAO

    () (Department of Economics, University of Southern California, USA;
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore;
    City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on the impact of marijuana decriminalization policy on marijuana smoking prevalence. Due to mixed findings in the existing studies, we attempt to find a common basis to explain the different results across papers. The main purpose is to provide a coherent background as to what outcomes may be expected from certain type of data, econometric models, and explanatory variables. If possible, we also try to provide the explanation as to why certain results are found.

Suggested Citation

  • Kannika Damrongplasit & Cheng Hsiao, 2009. "Decriminalization Policy And Marijuana Smoking Prevalence: A Look At The Literature," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 54(04), pages 621-644.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:54:y:2009:i:04:n:s0217590809003483
    DOI: 10.1142/S0217590809003483
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0217590809003483
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosalie Liccardo Pacula & Jamie F. Chriqui & Joanna King, 2003. "Marijuana Decriminalization: What does it mean in the United States?," NBER Working Papers 9690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Saffer, Henry & Chaloupka, Frank, 1999. "The Demand for Illicit Drugs," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(3), pages 401-411, July.
    3. Henry Saffer & Frank J. Chaloupka, 1999. "Demographic Differentials in the Demand for Alcohol and Illicit Drugs," NBER Chapters, in: The Economic Analysis of Substance Use and Abuse: An Integration of Econometric and Behavioral Economic Research, pages 187-212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Frank J. Chaloupka & Rosalie Liccardo Pacula & Matthew C. Farrelly & Lloyd D. Johnston & Patrick M. O'Malley, 1999. "Do Higher Cigarette Prices Encourage Youth to Use Marijuana?," NBER Working Papers 6939, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, 1998. "Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Consumption: Is There Really a Gateway Effect?," NBER Working Papers 6348, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. Liana Jacobi & Michelle Sovinsky, 2012. "Marijuana on main street: What if?," ECON - Working Papers 087, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Decriminalization; Marijuana Smoking Prevalence; I12; I18;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:54:y:2009:i:04:n:s0217590809003483. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Tai Tone Lim). General contact details of provider: http://www.worldscinet.com/ser/ser.shtml .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.