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Measuring regional inequality of education in China: widening coast-inland gap or widening rural-urban gap?

Author

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  • Xiaolei Qian

    (Department of Economics, Monash University, Australia)

  • Russell Smyth

    (Department of Economics, Monash University, Australia)

Abstract

This article measures education inequality between the coastal and inland provinces and compares it with rural-urban educational inequality in China, using Gini education coefficients and decomposition analysis. The main finding of the article is that disparities in access to education between rural and urban areas rather than between coastal and inland provinces are the major cause of educational inequality in China. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaolei Qian & Russell Smyth, 2008. "Measuring regional inequality of education in China: widening coast-inland gap or widening rural-urban gap?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 132-144.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:2:p:132-144
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1396
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1396
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Jensen & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 1997. "Child labour or school attendance? Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(4), pages 407-424.
    2. Chen, Baizhu & Feng, Yi, 2000. "Determinants of economic growth in China: Private enterprise, education, and openness," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-15.
    3. Lee, Jongchul, 2000. "Changes in the source of China's regional inequality," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 232-245.
    4. Park, Kang H., 1996. "Educational expansion and educational inequality on income distribution," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 51-58, February.
    5. Jones, Derek C. & Li, Cheng & Owen, Ann L., 2003. "Growth and regional inequality in China during the reform era," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 186-200.
    6. Tsang, Mun C., 1996. "Financial reform of basic education in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 423-444, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kate Glazebrook & Ligang Song, 2013. "Is China up to the Test? A Review of Theories and Priorities for Education Investment for a Modern China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(4), pages 56-78, July.
    2. Chi, Wei & Qian, Xiaoye, 2016. "Human capital investment in children: An empirical study of household child education expenditure in China, 2007 and 2011," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 52-65.
    3. IBOURK, Aomar & AMAGHOUSS, Jabrane, 2015. "Inequality In Education In The Mena Region: A Macroeconometric Investigation Using Normative Indicators," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(2), pages 129-146.
    4. Hania Wu & Tony Tam, 2015. "Economic Development and Socioeconomic Inequality of Well-Being: A Cross-Sectional Time-Series Analysis of Urban China, 2003–2011," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 401-425, November.
    5. Hallinger, Philip & Liu, Shangnan, 2016. "Leadership and teacher learning in urban and rural schools in China: Meeting the dual challenges of equity and effectiveness," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 163-173.
    6. Salwa TRABELSI, 2013. "Regional Inequality Of Education In Tunisia: An Evaluation By The Gini Index," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 37, pages 95-117.
    7. Aomar Ibourk & Jabrane Amaghouss, 2016. "The dynamics of the reduction of educational inequalities in Africa: an approach by the Kuznets curve - a comparative analysis of the trajectories of anglophone, francophone and Arabic countries," African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 119-136.
    8. Yingru Li & Yehua Dennis Wei, 2014. "Multidimensional Inequalities in Health Care Distribution in Provincial China: A Case Study of Henan Province," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 105(1), pages 91-106, February.

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