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Education or employment-choices facing young people in Kazakhstan

Author

Listed:
  • Yelena Kalyuzhnova

    (The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 218, Reading, RG6 6AA, UK)

  • Uma Kambhampati

    (The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 218, Reading, RG6 6AA, UK)

Abstract

This paper considers the links between education and employment in Kazakhstan. Using a sample of 12 000 Kazakhstani households, we analyse the factors determining the choice made by young adults between education and work within a multinomial logit framework. Our results confirm that while men are more likely to work and to remain unemployed, women are actually much more likely than men to study further. The main findings of the paper are firstly, contrary to studies elsewhere in the world, the family's income level does not influence the probability of study but influences all other choices significantly. Secondly, like studies conducted on most other countries of the world, the educational status of parents significantly influences the choices made by their offspring. In addition, the regional (location) characteristics play a role in the choice of post-compulsory education. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Yelena Kalyuzhnova & Uma Kambhampati, 2007. "Education or employment-choices facing young people in Kazakhstan," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 607-626.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:19:y:2007:i:5:p:607-626
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1343
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Spagat, Michael, 2006. "Human capital and the future of transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 44-56, March.
    2. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    3. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
    4. Rice, P., 2002. "The great divide: regional differences in education and training," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0201, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    5. Rice, Patricia, 2000. "Participation in further education and training: how much do gender and race matter?," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0019, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    6. repec:lan:wpaper:1022 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Rice, Patricia G, 1987. "The Demand for Post-compulsory Education in the UK and the Effects of Educational Maintenance Allowances," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(216), pages 465-475, November.
    8. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1997. "The Career Decisions of Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(3), pages 473-522, June.
    9. Leslie, Derek & Drinkwater, Stephen, 1999. "Staying on in Full-Time Education: Reasons for Higher Participation Rates among Ethnic Minority Males and Females," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 63-77, February.
    10. Patricia Rice, 1999. "The impact of local labour markets on investment in further education: Evidence from the England and Wales youth cohort studies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 287-312.
    11. Nguyen, Anh & Taylor, Jim & Bradley, Steve, 2003. "Relative pay and job satisfaction: some new evidence," MPRA Paper 1382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Fan, Chengze Simon & Overland, Jody & Spagat, Michael, 1999. "Human Capital, Growth, and Inequality in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 618-643, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2014. "Household survey data for research on well-being and behavior in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 819-835.

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