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Capacity development for agricultural biotechnology in developing countries: an innovation systems view of what it is and how to develop it

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  • Andy Hall

    (United Nations University, Maastricht)

Abstract

There are divergent views on what capacity development might mean in relation to agricultural biotechnology. The core of this debate is whether this should involve the development of human capital and research infrastructure, or whether it should encompass a wider range of activities which also include developing the capacity to use knowledge productively. This paper uses the innovation systems concept to shed light on this discussion, arguing that it is innovation capacity rather than science and technology capacity that has to be developed. It then presents six examples of different capacity development approaches. It concludes by suggesting that policy needs to take a multidimensional approach to capacity development in line with innovation systems perspective. But it also argues that policy needs to recognise the need to develop the capacity of diversity of innovation systems and that a key part of the capacity development task is to bring about the integration of these different systems at strategic points in time. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Andy Hall, 2005. "Capacity development for agricultural biotechnology in developing countries: an innovation systems view of what it is and how to develop it," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 611-630.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:5:p:611-630
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1227
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    1. Lynn Mytelka, 2000. "Local Systems Of Innovation In A Globalized World Economy," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 15-32.
    2. Rukuni, Mandivamba & Blackie, Malcolm J. & Eicher, Carl K., 1998. "Crafting smallholder-driven agricultural research systems in Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    3. Hall, Andrew & Bockett, Geoffrey & Taylor, Sarah & Sivamohan, M. V. K . & Clark, Norman, 2001. "Why Research Partnerships Really Matter: Innovation Theory, Institutional Arrangements and Implications for Developing New Technology for the Poor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 783-797, May.
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