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Joseph Stiglitz's, Globalization and its Discontents

  • Jonathan Perraton

    (Department of Economics and Political Economy Research Centre, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK)

Joseph Stiglitz's Globalization and its Discontents has sparked a major critical response since its publication in that it appears to encapsulate widespread doubts about globalization processes and their governance. This review aims to probe further Stiglitz's general analysis and policy prescriptions. It is argued that Stiglitz's central concern is how globalization as currently practised acts to exacerbate existing market failures and produce new ones, and the appropriate response of international economic institutions to address the resulting global collective action problems and ensure that the potential gains from globalization are realized. Whilst many of his proposals remain vague, they can be seen as part of an emerging global social democratic agenda. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 16 (2004)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 897-905

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:16:y:2004:i:6:p:897-905
DOI: 10.1002/jid.1134
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  1. Rudra, Nita, 2002. "Globalization and the Decline of the Welfare State in Less-Developed Countries," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(02), pages 411-445, March.
  2. Williamson, John, 1993. "Democracy and the "Washington consensus"," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(8), pages 1329-1336, August.
  3. Kaushik Basu, 2003. "Globalization and the Politics of International Finance: The Stiglitz Verdict," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 885-899, September.
  4. Aggarwal, Aradhna, 2004. "Macro Economic Determinants of Antidumping: A Comparative Analysis of Developed and Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1043-1057, June.
  5. Summers, Larry, 2003. "Cyclical dynamics in the new economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 525-530, July.
  6. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2001. "Global Implications of Self-Orientated National Monetary Rules," CEPR Discussion Papers 2856, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2003. "Globalization and growth in emerging markets and the New Economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 505-524, July.
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