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Tax performance: a comparative study

Author

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  • Joweria M. Teera

    (Department of Economics and International Development, University of Bath, Bath, UK)

  • John Hudson

    (Department of Economics and International Development, University of Bath, Bath, UK)

Abstract

This paper seeks to analyse tax performance across countries, utilizing what Musgrave (1969) referred to as the stochastic approach, where tax performance is analysed by comparisons with the average performance. The regression approach to tax performance assessment is used and a tax effort index is constructed. Among the variables that are identified to be important determinants of tax shares is a measure of tax evasion. The tax effort indices obtained show that generally the upper middle-income and high-income OECD groups are making better use of their tax bases to increase revenue. There are also economies of scale with respect to population density. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Joweria M. Teera & John Hudson, 2004. "Tax performance: a comparative study," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 785-802.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:16:y:2004:i:6:p:785-802
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1113
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1113
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Andreoni & Brian Erard & Jonathan Feinstein, 1998. "Tax Compliance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 818-860, June.
    2. Janet Gale Stotsky & Asegedech WoldeMariam, 1997. "Tax Effort in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 97/107, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Vito Tanzi, 1989. "The Impact of Macroeconomic Policies on the Level of Taxation and the Fiscal Balance in Developing Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 36(3), pages 633-656, September.
    4. Franco-Rodriguez, Susana & Morrissey, Oliver & McGillivray, Mark, 1998. "Aid and the Public Sector in Pakistan: Evidence with Endogenous Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 1241-1250, July.
    5. Raja J. Chelliah, 1971. "Trends in Taxation in Developing Countries (Les tendances de la fiscalité dans les pays en voie de développement) (Tendencias tributarias en los países en desarrollo)," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 18(2), pages 254-331, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leanora Alecia Brown & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2015. "International Debt Forgiveness: Who Gets Picked and Its Effect On The Tax Effort Of Developing Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1504, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    2. Fahad Hassan Khan, 2014. "From revenues to democracy?," Departmental Working Papers 2014-25, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    3. Productivity Commission, 2008. "Assessing Local Government Revenue Raising Capacity," Research Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 26.
    4. repec:taf:jdevst:v:52:y:2016:i:12:p:1744-1758 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Abrams M.E. Tagem, 2017. "The economics and politics of foreign aid and domestic revenue," WIDER Working Paper Series 180, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Attiya Y. Javid & Umaima Arif, 2012. "Analysis of Revenue Potential and Revenue Effort in Developing Asian Countries," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(4), pages 365-380.
    7. José Antonio Alonso & Carlos Garcimartín, "undated". "Does Aid Hinder Tax Efforts? More Evidence," Discussion Papers 11/04, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    8. Giulia Mascagni, 2016. "Aid and Taxation in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(12), pages 1744-1758, December.
    9. Lisa CHAUVET & Marin FERRY, 2016. "Taxation, infrastructure, and firm performance in developing countries," Working Papers 3510, FERDI.
    10. Ángeles Castro Gerardo & Ramírez Camarillo Diana Berenice, 2014. "Determinants of tax revenue in OECD countries over the period 2001-2011," Contaduría y Administración, Accounting and Management, vol. 59(3), pages 35-60, julio-sep.
    11. Djedje Hermann Yohou & Michaël Goujon & Bertrand Laporte & Samuel Guerineau, 2016. "Is Aid Unfriendly to Tax? African Evidence of Heterogeneous Direct and Indirect Effects," Working Papers halshs-01321620, HAL.
    12. José Antonio Alonso & Carlos Garcimartín & Luis Rivas, 2011. "Taxes, Foreign Aid and Quality of Governance Institutions," Chapters,in: Does Economic Governance Matter?, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Christian von Haldenwang & Maksym Ivanyna, 2017. "Does the political resource curse affect public finance? The vulnerability of tax revenue in resource-rich countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 007, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. David A. Grigorian & Hamid R Davoodi, 2007. "Tax Potential vs. Tax Effort; A Cross-Country Analysis of Armenia's Stubbornly Low Tax Collection," IMF Working Papers 07/106, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Morrissey, Oliver, 2015. "Aid and Government Fiscal Behavior: Assessing Recent Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 98-105.
    16. Marcus André Melo & Armando Barrientos & André Canuto Coelho, 2014. "Taxation, redistribution and the social contract in Brazil," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series iriba_wp11, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    17. Paulo Drummond & Wendell Daal & Nandini Srivastava & Luiz E Oliveira, 2012. "Mobilizing Revenue in Sub-Saharan Africa; Empirical Norms and Key Determinants," IMF Working Papers 12/108, International Monetary Fund.
    18. Qian WANG & Chunli SHEN & Heng-fu ZOU, 2009. "Local Government Tax Effort In China: An Analysis Of Provincial Tax Performance," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 29, pages 203-236.
    19. Ivanyna, Maksym & von Haldenwang, Christian, 2012. "A comparative view on the tax performance of developing countries: Regional patterns, non-tax revenue and governance," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-44.
    20. Pamela Lenton & Mike Masiye & Paul Mosley, 2017. "Taxpayer’s dilemma: how can ‘fiscal contracts’ work in developing countries?," Working Papers 2017004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    21. Jean-Louis Combes & Rasmané Ouedraogo & Sampawende J Tapsoba, 2016. "What Does Aid Do to Fiscal Policy? New Evidence," IMF Working Papers 16/112, International Monetary Fund.

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