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The impact of microfinance institutions in local financial markets: a case study from Kenya

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  • Susan Johnson

    (Centre for Development Studies, University of Bath, UK)

Abstract

This paper looks beyond the direct impact of microcredit provision on users to examine whether microfinance institutions (MFIs) have had wider impacts within the local financial markets in which they are operating. It considers the potential for both competition and demonstration effects on other financial providers. In the context of local financial markets in and around the small town of Karatina in Central Kenya, supply side information is used to investigate the key changes in provision between 1999 and 2003. The paper concludes that changing macroeconomic conditions have been the main driver increasing competition for middle and lower income clients and that few competition or demonstration effects resulting from the MFIs are in evidence. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Johnson, 2004. "The impact of microfinance institutions in local financial markets: a case study from Kenya," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 501-517.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:16:y:2004:i:3:p:501-517
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1088
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1088
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frank Place & S. E. Migot-Adholla, 1998. "The Economic Effects of Land Registration on Smallholder Farms in Kenya: Evidence from Nyeri and Kakamega Districts," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(3), pages 360-373.
    2. Pinckney, Thomas C & Kimuyu, Peter K, 1994. "Land Tenure Reform in East Africa: Good, Bad or Unimportant?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 3(1), pages 1-28, April.
    3. Hulme, David, 2000. "Impact Assessment Methodologies for Microfinance: Theory, Experience and Better Practice," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 79-98, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Copestake, James, 2007. "Mainstreaming Microfinance: Social Performance Management or Mission Drift?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1721-1738, October.
    2. repec:ipn:esecon:v:12:y:2017:i:46:p:41-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alex Addae-Korankye & Alex Abada, 2017. "Microfinance and Women Empowerment in Madina in Accra, Ghana," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 7(3), pages 222-231, March.

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