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Age and proximity to death as predictors of GP care costs: results from a study of nursing home patients

Author

Listed:
  • Ciaran O'Neill

    (School of Public Policy, Economics and Law, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland)

  • Lindsay Groom

    (Division of General Practice, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

  • Anthony J. Avery

    (Division of General Practice, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

  • Daphne Boot

    (Division of General Practice, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

  • Karine Thornhill

    (Division of General Practice, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a study of GP costs associated with a group of nursing home patients who died at various stages during a 12-month period. The relationship between costs per month of care, patient age and proximity to death, where sex and diagnosis are controlled for are reported. A comparison of care costs for patients in their last year of life and those who survived the course of the study is also made. The study found that those in their last year of life were significantly more expensive to care for than those who survived the duration of the study, but that there was no statistically significant difference in age. In multivariate regression analyses, it was also found that among those who died during the study care costs were unrelated to age, but significantly related to proximity to death. The study supports the contention of others (Zweifel P, Felder S, Meiers M. Ageing of population and health care expenditure: a red herring? Health Econ 1999; 8: 485-496) that health care costs are more directly related to proximity to death than age. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Ciaran O'Neill & Lindsay Groom & Anthony J. Avery & Daphne Boot & Karine Thornhill, 2000. "Age and proximity to death as predictors of GP care costs: results from a study of nursing home patients," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(8), pages 733-738.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:9:y:2000:i:8:p:733-738
    DOI: 10.1002/1099-1050(200012)9:8<733::AID-HEC564>3.0.CO;2-U
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Zweifel & Stefan Felder & Markus Meiers, 1999. "Ageing of population and health care expenditure: a red herring?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(6), pages 485-496.
    2. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. de Meijer, Claudine & Koopmanschap, Marc & d' Uva, Teresa Bago & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2011. "Determinants of long-term care spending: Age, time to death or disability?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 425-438, March.
    2. David C. Grabowski & Edward C. Norton, 2012. "Nursing Home Quality of Care," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 29 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Negri­n, Miguel A. & Vázquez-Polo, Francisco-José, 2008. "Incorporating model uncertainty in cost-effectiveness analysis: A Bayesian model averaging approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1250-1259, September.
    4. Polder, Johan J. & Barendregt, Jan J. & van Oers, Hans, 2006. "Health care costs in the last year of life--The Dutch experience," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1720-1731, October.
    5. Stefan Felder & Peter Zweifel & Andreas Werblow, 2006. "Population Ageing and Health Care Expenditure: Is Long-term Care Different?," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(V), pages 43-48.
    6. Stefan Felder, 2013. "The Impact of Demographic Change on Healthcare Expenditure," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(1), pages 03-06, 04.
    7. Andreas Werblow & Stefan Felder & Peter Zweifel, 2007. "Population ageing and health care expenditure: a school of 'red herrings'?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1109-1126.
    8. Layte, Richard, 2006. "An Analysis of the Impact of Age and Proximity of Death on Health Care Costs in Ireland," Papers HRBWP24, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Richard Layte, 2007. "An Analysis of the Impact of Age and Proximity of Death on Health Care Costs in Ireland," Papers WP193, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    10. F. J. Vázquez-Polo & M. A. Negrín Hernández & B. González López-Valcárcel, 2005. "Using covariates to reduce uncertainty in the economic evaluation of clinical trial data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 545-557.
    11. repec:ces:ifodic:v:11:y:2013:i:1:p:19078503 is not listed on IDEAS

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