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The Effect of Medicare Eligibility on Spousal Insurance Coverage

Author

Listed:
  • Marcus Dillender
  • Karen Mulligan

Abstract

A majority of married couples in the United States take advantage of the fact that employers often provide health insurance coverage to spouses. When the older spouses become eligible for Medicare, however, many of them can no longer provide their younger spouses with coverage. In this paper, we study how spousal eligibility for Medicare affects the health insurance and health care access of the younger spouse. We find spousal eligibility for Medicare results in the younger spouse having worse insurance coverage and reduced access to health care services.
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(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Marcus Dillender & Karen Mulligan, 2016. "The Effect of Medicare Eligibility on Spousal Insurance Coverage," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(5), pages 591-605, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:25:y:2016:i:5:p:591-605
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Card & Carlos Dobkin & Nicole Maestas, 2009. "Does Medicare Save Lives?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 597-636.
    2. Guy David & Phil Saynisch & Victoria Acevedo‚ÄźPerez & Mark D. Neuman, 2012. "Affording To Wait: Medicare Initiation And The Use Of Health Care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 1030-1036, August.
    3. David Card & Carlos Dobkin & Nicole Maestas, 2008. "The Impact of Nearly Universal Insurance Coverage on Health Care Utilization: Evidence from Medicare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 2242-2258, December.
    4. Finkelstein, Amy & McKnight, Robin, 2008. "What did Medicare do? The initial impact of Medicare on mortality and out of pocket medical spending," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(7), pages 1644-1668, July.
    5. Chad D. Meyerhoefer & Samuel H. Zuvekas & Richard Manski, 2014. "The Demand For Preventive And Restorative Dental Services," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 14-32, January.
    6. Robin L. Lumsdaine & James H. Stock & David A. Wise, 1996. "Why Are Retirement Rates So High at Age 65?," NBER Chapters,in: Advances in the Economics of Aging, pages 61-82 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2003:93:1:130-137_1 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2010.300031_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Richard W. Johnson, 2007. "What Happens to Health Benefits after Retirement?," Work Opportunity Briefs wob_7, Center for Retirement Research, revised Feb 2007.
    10. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2004:94:5:699-702_4 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions

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