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Measuring Health Spillovers for Economic Evaluation: A Case Study in Meningitis

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  • Hareth Al‐Janabi
  • Job Van Exel
  • Werner Brouwer
  • Caroline Trotter
  • Linda Glennie
  • Laurie Hannigan
  • Joanna Coast

Abstract

The health of carers and others close to the patient will often be relevant to economic evaluation, but it is very rarely considered in practice. This may reflect a lack of understanding of how the spillover effect of illness can be appropriately quantified. In this study we used three different approaches to quantify health spillovers resulting from meningitis. We conducted a survey of 1218 family networks affected by meningitis and used regression modelling to estimate spillover effects. The findings show that meningitis had long‐term effects on family members' health, particularly affecting the likelihood of family members reporting anxiety and depression. These effects extended beyond a single close family member. These findings suggest that vaccinating against meningitis will bring significant health benefits not just to those that might have contracted the illness but also to their family networks. In methodological terms, different approaches for quantifying health spillovers provided broadly consistent results. The choice of method will be influenced by the ease of collecting primary data from family members in intervention contexts. © 2015 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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  • Hareth Al‐Janabi & Job Van Exel & Werner Brouwer & Caroline Trotter & Linda Glennie & Laurie Hannigan & Joanna Coast, 2016. "Measuring Health Spillovers for Economic Evaluation: A Case Study in Meningitis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(12), pages 1529-1544, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:25:y:2016:i:12:p:1529-1544
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.3259
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    Cited by:

    1. Hannah Christensen & Hareth Al-Janabi & Pierre Levy & Maarten J. Postma & David E. Bloom & Paolo Landa & Oliver Damm & David M. Salisbury & Javier Diez-Domingo & Adrian K. Towse & Paula K. Lorgelly & , 2020. "Economic evaluation of meningococcal vaccines: considerations for the future," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 21(2), pages 297-309, March.
    2. Sandy Tubeuf & Eirini-Christina Saloniki & David Cottrell, 2018. "Family health spillovers in cost-effectiveness analysis: Evidence from self-harming adolescents in England," Working Papers 1803, Academic Unit of Health Economics, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds.
    3. Helen Weatherly & Rita Faria & Bernard Van den Berg & Mark Sculpher & Peter O’Neill & Kay Nolan & Julie Glanville & Jaana Isojarvi & Erin Baragula & Mary Edwards, 2017. "Scoping review on social care economic evaluation methods," Working Papers 150cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    4. Hareth Al-Janabi & Andrea Manca & Joanna Coast, 2017. "Predicting carer health effects for use in economic evaluation," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(9), pages 1-18, September.
    5. Hareth Al‐Janabi, 2018. "Do capability and functioning differ? A study of U.K. survey responses," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 465-479, March.
    6. Henry, Edward & Cullinan, John, 2021. "Mental health spillovers from serious family illness: Doubly robust estimation using EQ-5D-5L population normative data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 279(C).
    7. Grace S Chung & David W Hutton, 2020. "Epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of universal meningitis b vaccination among college students prior to college entry," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(10), pages 1-13, October.
    8. Jere R. Behrman & Flávio Cunha & Esteban Puentes & Fan Wang, 2018. "You Are What Your Parents Think: Height and Local Reference Points," PIER Working Paper Archive 18-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 22 Apr 2018.

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