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Searching for a better willingness to pay elicitation method in rural Nigeria: the binary question with follow-up method versus the bidding game technique

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  • Obinna Onwujekwe

    (Health Policy Research Unit, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the theoretical validity and predictive validity of the binary with follow-up questions technique and the bidding game, using hypothetical and actual WTP for insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) in Nigeria. Methods: Each elicitation method was applied in one of two rural communities in Enugu state, Nigeria. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was administered to household heads or representatives of households. WTP was elicited in each after presenting the scenario and showing a sample of the ITNs to the respondents. Then, within an interval of 1-2 months, the nets were sold to the respondents to compare hypothetical and actual WTP. Findings: Consistent slightly higher mean and median WTP amounts were elicited from Mbano where the bidding game was used. The WTP technique was able to predict WTP responses correctly in 75% and 85% of cases in Orba and Mbano, respectively. Chi-square analysis did not show any statistical difference in values from both communities (p>0.05). Conclusion: Though the two techniques yielded similar results, the thrust should be the development of a WTP elicitation method that best mimics the bargaining process in normal market situations in rural Nigeria. Such an indigenous technique will help improve the predictive validity of the contingent valuation method. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Obinna Onwujekwe, 2001. "Searching for a better willingness to pay elicitation method in rural Nigeria: the binary question with follow-up method versus the bidding game technique," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(2), pages 147-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:10:y:2001:i:2:p:147-158
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.568
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    Cited by:

    1. Mehmet Kutluay & Roy Brouwer & Richard S. J. Tol, 2019. "Valuing malaria morbidity: results from a global meta-analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 301-321, July.
    2. Kanya, Lucy & Sanghera, Sabina & Lewin, Alex & Fox-Rushby, Julia, 2019. "The criterion validity of willingness to pay methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 232(C), pages 238-261.
    3. Kanya, Lucy & Saghera, Sabina & Lewin, Alex & Fox-Rushby, Julia, 2019. "The criterion validity of willingness to pay methods: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100741, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Adams, Katherine P. & Vosti, Stephen A. & Lybbert, Travis J. & Ayifah, Emmanuel, 2011. "Integrating Economic Analysis with a Randomized Controlled Trial: Willingness-to-Pay for a New Maternal Nutrient Supplement," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103793, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Kevin C. Urama & Ian Hodge, 2006. "Participatory Environmental Education and Willingness to Pay for River Basin Management: Empirical Evidence from Nigeria," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 82(4), pages 542-561.

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