IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v87y2011iii1p382-402.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Accounting for Spatial Heterogeneity and Autocorrelation in Spatial Discrete Choice Models: Implications for Behavioral Predictions

Author

Listed:
  • Kurt E. Schnier
  • Ronald G. Felthoven

Abstract

The random utility model (RUM) is commonly used in the land-use and fishery economics literature. This research investigates the affect that spatial heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation have within the RUM framework using alternative specifications of the multinomial logit, multinomial probit, and spatial multinomial probit models. Using data on the spatial decisions of fishermen, the results illustrate that ignoring spatial heterogeneity in the unobservable portion of the RUM dramatically affects model performance and welfare estimates. Furthermore, accounting for spatial autocorrelation in addition to spatial heterogeneity increases the performance of the RUM.

Suggested Citation

  • Kurt E. Schnier & Ronald G. Felthoven, 2011. "Accounting for Spatial Heterogeneity and Autocorrelation in Spatial Discrete Choice Models: Implications for Behavioral Predictions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(3), pages 382-402.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:87:y:2011:iii:1:p:382-402
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/87/3/382
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Keane, Michael P, 1994. "A Computationally Practical Simulation Estimator for Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(1), pages 95-116, January.
    2. Hajivassiliou, Vassilis & McFadden, Daniel & Ruud, Paul, 1996. "Simulation of multivariate normal rectangle probabilities and their derivatives theoretical and computational results," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1-2), pages 85-134.
    3. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387.
    4. Bolduc, Denis, 1999. "A practical technique to estimate multinomial probit models in transportation," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 63-79, February.
    5. Berry, Steven & Levinsohn, James & Pakes, Ariel, 1995. "Automobile Prices in Market Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(4), pages 841-890, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. T. Randall Fortenbery & Steven C. Deller & Lindsay Amiel, 2013. "The Location Decisions of Biodiesel Refineries," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-136.
    2. Meyerhoff, J├╝rgen, 2013. "Do turbines in the vicinity of respondents' residences influence choices among programmes for future wind power generation?," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 58-71.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:87:y:2011:iii:1:p:382-402. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.