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Estimating the Demand for Tree Canopy: A Second-Stage Hedonic Price Analysis in Portland, Oregon

  • Noelwah R. Netusil
  • Sudip Chattopadhyay
  • Kent F. Kovacs

The benefits of large patches of tree canopy are estimated by applying a hedonic price model to the sale of single-family residential properties in Portland, Oregon. The first-stage analysis provides evidence of diminishing returns from increasing tree canopy past a certain level. The second-stage analysis uses a survey of property owners’ preferences and socioeconomic characteristics to overcome the problem of endogeneity. Average benefit estimates for the mean canopy cover within mile of properties in the study area, using the second-stage model, are between 0.75% and 2.52% of the mean sale price.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/86/2/281
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 86 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 281-293

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:i:2:p:281-293
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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  1. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
  2. Brent L. Mahan & BStephen Polasky & Richard M. Adams, 2000. "Valuing Urban Wetlands: A Property Price Approach," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(1), pages 100-113.
  3. Noelwah R. Netusil, 2005. "The Effect of Environmental Zoning and Amenities on Property Values: Portland, Oregon," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(2).
  4. Sudip Chattopadhyay, 1999. "Estimating the Demand for Air Quality: New Evidence Based on the Chicago Housing Market," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(1), pages 22-38.
  5. Kent F. Kovacs & Douglas M. Larson, 2008. "Identifying Individual Discount Rates and Valuing Public Open Space with Stated-Preference Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(2), pages 209-224.
  6. Mueller, Julie M. & Loomis, John B., 2008. "Spatial Dependence in Hedonic Property Models: Do Different Corrections For Spatial Dependence Result in Economically Significant Differences in Estimated Implicit Prices?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(2), August.
  7. Geoghegan, Jacqueline & Wainger, Lisa A. & Bockstael, Nancy E., 1997. "Spatial landscape indices in a hedonic framework: an ecological economics analysis using GIS," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 251-264, December.
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