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Spatial Implications of Increases in the Female Labor Force: A Theoretical and Empirical Synthesis

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  • Janice F. Madden
  • JMichelle J. White

Abstract

Research by both geographers and psychologists suggests that there are differences in females' and males' everyday geographic and spatial knowledge. These differences in knowledge have been attributed to variances in biology and hormonal levels; ...

Suggested Citation

  • Janice F. Madden & JMichelle J. White, 1980. "Spatial Implications of Increases in the Female Labor Force: A Theoretical and Empirical Synthesis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(4), pages 432-446.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:56:y:1980:i:4:p:432-446
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberts, Jennifer & Hodgson, Robert & Dolan, Paul, 2011. "“It's driving her mad”: Gender differences in the effects of commuting on psychological health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1064-1076.
    2. Francesca Carta & Marta De Philippis, 2015. "You've come a long way, baby. Effects of commuting times on couples' labour supply," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1003, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Barbara Burnell, 1997. "Some Reflections on the Spatial Dimensions of Occupational Segregation," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 69-86.
    4. Lena Edlund & Cecilia Machado & Maria Sviatschi, 2016. "Bright Minds, Big Rent: Gentrification and the Rising Returns to Skill," Working Papers 16-36, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Lena Edlund & Cecilia Machado & Maria Micaela Sviatschi, 2015. "Bright Minds, Big Rent: Gentrification and the Rising Returns to Skill," NBER Working Papers 21729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kim, Seyoung, 1994. "Gender Differences in Commuting: An Empirical Study of the Greater Los Angeles Metropolitan Area," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2n60d857, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Rémi Lemoy & Charles Raux & Pablo Jensen, 2016. "Exploring the polycentric city with multi-worker households: an agent-based microeconomic model," Post-Print hal-00602087, HAL.
    8. Kotyrlo, Elena, 2016. "Space-time dynamics of fertility and commuting," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 41, pages 78-95.
    9. Ana Regina Vides de Andrade & Anabella Lardé de Palomo & Lissette Calderón Martínez, 2002. "Geographical Exclusion in Rural Areas of El Salvador: Its Impact on Labor Market Outcomes," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3275, Inter-American Development Bank.

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