IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/unt/jnapdj/v15y2008i1p35-64.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Air pollution and income distribution in India

Author

Listed:
  • Kakali Mukhopadhyay

    () (Department of Agricultural Economics, McGill University, MacDonald Campus, Canada)

Abstract

Concern over the environmental effects of fossil fuels in India has been growing as domestic consumption levels increase. Along with industry, households are major consumers of commercial energy and, consequently, major contributors to the total energy use in India. Emission levels in the country are gradually increasing. The present study estimates emissions related to fossil fuel combustion in India and also identifies the factors responsible for changes in those emissions during the 1980s and 1990s. Results show that the factor relating to changes in final demand, which reflect increased economic growth, had the greatest influence on emission levels. The study disaggregates households into three income groups, examining the contribution each makes to fossil-fuel-based pollution in India with respect to the various factors identified. Analysis indicates that higher- and middle-income groups generated more pollution due to excessive and inefficient consumption of commercial energy. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Kakali Mukhopadhyay, 2008. "Air pollution and income distribution in India," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 15(1), pages 35-64, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:unt:jnapdj:v:15:y:2008:i:1:p:35-64
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/apdj-15-1-2-Mukhopadhyay.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Choi, Ki-Hong & Ang, B. W., 2003. "Decomposition of aggregate energy intensity changes in two measures: ratio and difference," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 615-624, November.
    2. Torstein Bye & Annegrete Bruvoll & Jan Larsson, 2009. "Capacity Utilization in a Generalized Malmquist Index Including Environmental Factors: A Decomposition Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(3), pages 529-538.
    3. Greening, Lorna A. & Davis, William B. & Schipper, Lee & Khrushch, Marta, 1997. "Comparison of six decomposition methods: application to aggregate energy intensity for manufacturing in 10 OECD countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 375-390, July.
    4. Pachauri, Shonali & Spreng, Daniel, 2002. "Direct and indirect energy requirements of households in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 511-523, May.
    5. Mette Wier & Manfred Lenzen & Jesper Munksgaard & Sinne Smed, 2001. "Effects of Household Consumption Patterns on CO2 Requirements," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 259-274.
    6. Murthy, N.S. & Panda, M. & Parikh, J., 1997. "Economic growth, energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions in India: 1990-2020," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(02), pages 173-193, May.
    7. Reddy, Amulya K.N. & Reddy, B.Sudhakara, 1994. "Substitution of energy carriers for cooking in Bangalore," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 561-571.
    8. Mukhopadhyay, Kakali & Forssell, Osmo, 2005. "An empirical investigation of air pollution from fossil fuel combustion and its impact on health in India during 1973-1974 to 1996-1997," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 235-250, November.
    9. Murthy, N. S. & Panda, Manoj & Parikh, Jyoti, 1997. "Economic development, poverty reduction and carbon emissions in India," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 327-354, July.
    10. Pachauri, Shonali, 2004. "An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(15), pages 1723-1735, October.
    11. Ang, B.W. & Zhang, F.Q., 2000. "A survey of index decomposition analysis in energy and environmental studies," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 1149-1176.
    12. Munksgaard, Jesper & Pedersen, Klaus Alsted & Wien, Mette, 2000. "Impact of household consumption on CO2 emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 423-440, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jayanthakumaran, Kankesu & Verma, Reetu & Liu, Ying, 2012. "CO2 emissions, energy consumption, trade and income: A comparative analysis of China and India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 450-460.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unt:jnapdj:v:15:y:2008:i:1:p:35-64. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Macroeconomic Policy and Development Division, ESCAP). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/escapth.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.