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A causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth in Nepal

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  • Kamal Raj Dhungel

    () (Central Department of Economics, Tribhuvan University, Nepal)

Abstract

In the present paper, an attempt is made to examine the causal relationship between the per capita consumption of coal, electricity, oil and total commercial energy and the per capita real gross domestic product (GDP), using a co-integration and vector error correction model. The increase in real GDP, among other things, indicates a higher demand for a large quantity of commercial energy such as coal, oil and electricity. This implies that low infrastructure development limits the usage of commercial energy, which may also hold back economic growth. Empirical findings reveal that there is a unidirectional causality running from coal, oil and commercial energy consumption to per capita real GDP, whereas a unidirectional causality running from per capita real GDP to per capita electricity consumption is found. It is suggested that the input of per capita energy consumption stimulates enhanced economic growth in Nepal.

Suggested Citation

  • Kamal Raj Dhungel, 2008. "A causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth in Nepal," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 15(1), pages 137-150, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:unt:jnapdj:v:15:y:2008:i:1:p:137-150
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alkhathlan, Khalid & Javid, Muhammad, 2013. "Energy consumption, carbon emissions and economic growth in Saudi Arabia: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1525-1532.
    2. Akkemik, K. Ali & Göksal, Koray, 2012. "Energy consumption-GDP nexus: Heterogeneous panel causality analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 865-873.
    3. Cheratian, Iman & Goltabar, Saleh, 2017. "Energy Consumption and Regional Economic Growth: The Case of Iranian Manufacturing Sector," MPRA Paper 78315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Gupta, Geetu & Sahu, Naresh Chandra, 2009. "Causality between Electricity Consumption & Economic growth : Empirical Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 22942, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Nepal, Rabindra, 2011. "The roles and potentials of renewable energy in less-developed economies," MPRA Paper 31878, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 29 Jun 2011.
    6. Khatun, Fahmida & Ahamad, Mazbahul, 2015. "Foreign direct investment in the energy and power sector in Bangladesh: Implications for economic growth," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1369-1377.
    7. Ahmad, Ashfaq & Zhao, Yuhuan & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Bano, Sadia & Zhang, Zhonghua & Wang, Song & Liu, Ya, 2016. "Carbon emissions, energy consumption and economic growth: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis of the Indian economy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 131-143.
    8. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: A Long-Term Co-integrated Analysis for Turkey," MPRA Paper 55699, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Golam Ahamad, Mazbahul & Nazrul Islam, A.K.M., 2011. "Electricity consumption and economic growth nexus in Bangladesh: Revisited evidences," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6145-6150, October.
    10. Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2017. "Current Issues in Time-Series Analysis for the Energy-Growth Nexus; Asymmetries and Nonlinearities Case Study: Pakistan," MPRA Paper 82221, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Oct 2017.
    11. Akhmat, Ghulam & Zaman, Khalid & Shukui, Tan & Sajjad, Faiza, 2014. "Does energy consumption contribute to climate change? Evidence from major regions of the world," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 123-134.
    12. Nepal, Rabindra, 2012. "Roles and potentials of renewable energy in less-developed economies: The case of Nepal," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 2200-2206.
    13. Nepal, Rabindra & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2012. "Reforming small electricity systems under political instability: The case of Nepal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 242-251.

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