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The Effect of Teacher Gender on Student Achievement in Primary School

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Listed:
  • Heather Antecol
  • Ozkan Eren
  • Serkan Ozbeklik

Abstract

Using data from a randomized experiment, we find that having a female teacher lowers the math test scores of female primary school students in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Moreover, we do not find any effect of having a female teacher on male students' test scores (math or reading) or female students' reading test scores, which seems to rule out explanations pertaining to the unobserved quality differences between male and female teachers. Finally, this negative effect seems to persist only for female students who were assigned to a female teacher with a limited math background.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Antecol & Ozkan Eren & Serkan Ozbeklik, 2015. "The Effect of Teacher Gender on Student Achievement in Primary School," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 63-89.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/677391
    DOI: 10.1086/677391
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2005. "Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 152-157, May.
    2. Antecol, Heather & Eren, Ozkan & Ozbeklik, Serkan, 2013. "The effect of Teach for America on the distribution of student achievement in primary school: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 113-125.
    3. Bedard, Kelly & Cho, Insook, 2010. "Early gender test score gaps across OECD countries," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 348-363, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Puhani, Patrick A., 2018. "Do boys benefit from male teachers in elementary school? Evidence from administrative panel data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 340-354.
    2. Antecol, Heather & Eren, Ozkan & Ozbeklik, Serkan, 2013. "The effect of Teach for America on the distribution of student achievement in primary school: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 113-125.
    3. Höckel, Lisa, 2019. "Speaking the same language - The effect of foreign origin teachers on students’ language skills," Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203638, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Seth Gershenson & Stephen B. Holt & Nicholas Papageorge, 2015. "Who Believes in Me? The Effect of Student-Teacher Demographic Match on Teacher Expectations," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 15-231, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    5. My Nguyen, 2018. "The Relationship between Race-Congruent Students and Teachers: Does Racial Discrimination Exist?," Departmental Working Papers 2018-06, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    6. Höckel, Lisa Sofie, 2020. "Speaking the same language: The effect of foreign origin teachers on students' language skills," Ruhr Economic Papers 862, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Jaegeum Lim & Jonathan Meer, 2020. "Persistent Effects of Teacher–Student Gender Matches," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(3), pages 809-835.
    8. Nina Drange & Marte Rønning, 2017. "Child care center staff composition and early child development," Discussion Papers 870, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. Peter Hinrichs, 2014. "What Kind of Teachers Are Schools Looking For? Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Working Papers (Old Series) 1436, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 10 Dec 2014.
    10. Eble, Alex & Hu, Feng, 2020. "Child beliefs, societal beliefs, and teacher-student identity match," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).
    11. Wagner, Valentin & Riener, Gerhard, 2015. "Peers or parents? On non-monetary incentives in schools," DICE Discussion Papers 203, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    12. Gørtz, Mette & Johansen, Eva Rye & Simonsen, Marianne, 2018. "Academic achievement and the gender composition of preschool staff," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 241-258.
    13. Drange, Nina & Rønning, Marte, 2020. "Child care center quality and early child development," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    14. Debra Lynne Shepherd, 2017. "Gender, Self-concept and Mathematics and Science Performance of South African Grade 9 Students," Working Papers 11/2017, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    15. Michela Carlana, 2019. "Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(3), pages 1163-1224.
    16. Seah, Kelvin, 2018. "Do You Speak My Language? The Effect of Sharing a Teacher's Native Language on Student Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 11685, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Holt, Stephen B. & Papageorge, Nicholas W., 2016. "Who believes in me? The effect of student–teacher demographic match on teacher expectationsAuthor-Name: Gershenson, Seth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 209-224.
    18. Anna Folke Larsen & Afonso Saraiva Câmara Leme & Marianne Simonsen, 2020. "Pupil Well-being in Danish Primary and Lower Secondary Schools," Economics Working Papers 2020-13, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    19. Rakshit, Sonali & Sahoo, Soham, 2020. "Biased Teachers and Gender Gap in Learning Outcomes: Evidence from India," GLO Discussion Paper Series 684, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    20. Karthik Muralidharan & Ketki Sheth, 2016. "Bridging Education Gender Gaps in Developing Countries: The Role of Female Teachers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(2), pages 269-297.

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