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The New Consensus and Post-Keynesian Interest Rate Policy


  • Claude Gnos
  • Louis-Philippe Rochon


This paper outlines the fundamental arguments of the New Consensus, critiques it from a Post-Keynesian perspective, and offers a Post-Keynesian alternative to the Taylor Rule. While Post-Keynesian economics provides a theory of endogenous money with exogenous interest rates, it has no clear description of a central bank reaction function. We attempt to remedy this oversight by identifying some of the difficulties attached to developing a Post-Keynesian reaction function, and suggesting an approach to the setting of interest rates that is more consistent than the Taylor Rule with Keynes's General Theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Claude Gnos & Louis-Philippe Rochon, 2007. "The New Consensus and Post-Keynesian Interest Rate Policy," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 369-386.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:19:y:2007:i:3:p:369-386 DOI: 10.1080/09538250701453071

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hiroshi Nishi, 2014. "Varieties of economic growth regimes, types of macroeconomic policies and policy regimes: a post-Keynesian analysis," Chapters,in: Economic Crises and Policy Regimes, chapter 5, pages 101-123 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Eckhard Hein & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2010. "Macroeconomic Policy Mix, Employment and Inflation in a Post-Keynesian Alternative to the New Consensus Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 317-354.
    3. Hein, Eckhard, 2016. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid-1990s: Main developments," IPE Working Papers 75/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    4. Kai D. Schmid, 2010. "Medium-run macrodynamics and the consensus view of stabilization policy," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 322/2010, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    5. Noemi Levy-Orlik, 2012. "Financial Market Organizations, Central Banks and Credits: The Experience of Developing Economies," Chapters,in: Monetary Policy and Central Banking, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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