IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/revpoe/v17y2005i1p45-61.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Uncertainty, financial fragility and monitoring: Will Basle-type pragmatism resolve the Japanese banking crisis?

Author

Listed:
  • Yasushi Suzuki

Abstract

This paper argues that the naive adoption of an Anglo-American approach to the management of credit risk as the prescription for Japan's prolonged financial slump would amount to a very risky strategy. The neoclassical arguments for the adoption of Basle-type pragmatism and the adoption of Anglo-American financial norms neglect the important question of how to manage Japanese lenders' uncertainty, which affects their assessment of credit risk. We point out that an ill-planned transition without mechanisms for diversifying risk and uncertainty has encouraged herd behavior in lending. We also argue that Japan's traditional rent-based mode of financial intermediation and monitoring performed important functions, including the incubation of new enterprises, and should have been retained in alternative form rather than abandoned.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasushi Suzuki, 2005. "Uncertainty, financial fragility and monitoring: Will Basle-type pragmatism resolve the Japanese banking crisis?," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 45-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:17:y:2005:i:1:p:45-61
    DOI: 10.1080/0953825042000313807
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0953825042000313807
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Herbert A. Simon, 1996. "The Sciences of the Artificial, 3rd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262691914, January.
    2. Sunil Sharma & Sushil Bikhchandani, 2000. "Herd Behavior in Financial Markets; A Review," IMF Working Papers 00/48, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Davis, E. Philip, 1995. "Debt, Financial Fragility, and Systemic Risk," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198233312.
    4. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    5. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1996. "Whither Socialism?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262691825, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Eric Tymoigne, 2014. "Measuring macroprudential risk through financial fragility: a Minskian approach," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(4), pages 719-744.
    2. Eric Tymigne, 2011. "Financial stability, regulatory buffers and economic growth after the Great Recession: some regulatory implications," Chapters,in: Financial Instability and Economic Security after the Great Recession, chapter 6, pages 114-140 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Eric Tymoigne, 2010. "Detecting Ponzi Finance: An Evolutionary Approach to the Measure of Financial Fragility," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_605, Levy Economics Institute.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:17:y:2005:i:1:p:45-61. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CRPE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.