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Checking the consistency of poverty in Poland: 1997-2003 evidence


  • Adam Szulc


This study investigates the relationships between various types of poverty in Poland. Monetary poverty is examined together with subjective poverty and with a concept of deprivation-based poverty conceived as lacking particular dwelling resources. The results reveal quite important discrepancies between these three types of poverty. Though income and expenditure poverty incidence generally decreased during the period investigated, the share of persons living in subjective poverty was higher in 2003 than in 1997, while deprivation substantially decreased. Moreover, quite large discrepancies at the individual level could be observed. Some conflicting results were also found between the correlates of poverty of the three types.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam Szulc, 2008. "Checking the consistency of poverty in Poland: 1997-2003 evidence," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 33-55.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:20:y:2008:i:1:p:33-55 DOI: 10.1080/14631370701865714

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Modigliani, Franco, 1986. "Life Cycle, Individual Thrift, and the Wealth of Nations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 297-313, June.
    2. Böhringer, Christoph & Rutherford, Thomas Fox & Wiegard, Wolfgang, 2003. "Computable general equilibrium analysis: Opening a black box," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-56, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Rutherford, Thomas F., 1995. "Extension of GAMS for complementarity problems arising in applied economic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1299-1324, November.
    4. Miroslav VerbiÄ & Boris Majcen & Renger Van Nieuwkoop, 2006. "Sustainability of the Slovenian Pension System: An Analysis with an Overlapping-Generations General Equilibrium Model," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 60-81, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michal Brzezinski, 2011. "Accounting for recent trends in absolute poverty in Poland: a decomposition analysis," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 465-475, December.
    2. M. Brzeziński & B. Jancewicz & Natalia Letki, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in Poland," GINI Country Reports poland, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    3. Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2015. "Research on Poverty in Transition Economies: A Meta-analysis on Changes in the Determinants of Poverty," RRC Working Paper Series 51, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Michal Brzezinski, 2010. "Income Affluence in Poland," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 285-299, November.

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