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Trade, money and employment in intertemporal optimizing models of growth

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  • Rainer Klump

Abstract

This paper unites elements of Sidrauski's (1967) monetary model of growth, Ventura's (1997) analysis of the effects of international trade on growth, and some work on the labour market implications of growth by Barro and Sala-i-Martin (1995). It was shown by Ventura that, for a small economy, free international trade leads to an increase of the de facto elasticity of substitution between the domestic factors of production. The first part of the paper analyses how such an increase in the elasticity of substitution influences the steady state and the speed of convergence. From the Sidrauski model we know that money is super-neutral in the long-run but that monetary policy can have real effects along the transition path as long as the intertemporal elasticity of substitution is not equal to one. In the second part of this paper, it is shown how these results also depend on the elasticity of substitution between factors of production. The results give some important insights into possible interactions between monetary and trade policy in the long and short run. The last part of the paper deals with a modified version of the monetary growth model, which includes endogenous labour supply as in Klump (1993) or Barro and Sala-i-Martin (1995). In this context, international trade, by increasing the elasticity of substitution, leads to lower domestic employment in the long run whereas monetary policy may be able to increase employment at least in the short run. Thus, under certain circumstances, trade and monetary policy can be regarded as complementary with respect to their labour market effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Rainer Klump, 2001. "Trade, money and employment in intertemporal optimizing models of growth," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 411-428.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:10:y:2001:i:4:p:411-428
    DOI: 10.1080/09638190110073787
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gene M. Grossman (ed.), 1996. "Economic Growth," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 553.
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    Cited by:

    1. Klump, Rainer & McAdam, Peter & Willman, Alpo, 2004. "Factor substitution and factor augmenting technical progress in the US: a normalized supply-side system approach," Working Paper Series 367, European Central Bank.
    2. Michael Knoblach & Fabian Stöckl, 2020. "What Determines The Elasticity Of Substitution Between Capital And Labor? A Literature Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(4), pages 847-875, September.
    3. Klump, Rainer & Saam, Marianne, 2008. "Calibration of normalised CES production functions in dynamic models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 256-259, May.
    4. Xue, Jianpo & Yip, Chong K., 2012. "Factor Substitution And Economic Growth: A Unified Approach," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 625-656, September.
    5. Klump, Rainer, 2003. "Inflation, factor substitution and growth," Working Paper Series 280, European Central Bank.
    6. Rainer Klump & Peter McAdam & Alpo Willman, 2012. "The Normalized Ces Production Function: Theory And Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 769-799, December.
    7. Gómez, Manuel A., 2018. "Factor substitution and convergence speed in the neoclassical model with elastic labor supply," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 89-92.
    8. Gómez, Manuel A., 2017. "Factor substitution and long-run growth in the Lucas model with elastic labor supply," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 180-184.
    9. Marianne Saam, 2004. "Distributional Effects of Growth and the Elasticity of Substitution," DEGIT Conference Papers c009_031, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    10. Manuel A. Gómez, 2020. "Factor substitution, long‐run growth, and speed of convergence in the one‐sector convex endogenous‐growth model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 71(1), pages 2-21, February.
    11. Gómez, Manuel A., 2018. "Economic growth and factor substitution with elastic labor supply," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 49-57.
    12. Jianpo Xue & Chong K. Yip, 2015. "Balanced-Budget Rules, Elasticity of Substitution, and Macroeconomic (In)Stability," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(2), pages 196-218, April.

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