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Measuring Corruption in Infrastructure: Evidence from Transition and Developing Countries

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  • Charles Kenny

Abstract

This paper examines what we can say about the extent and impact of corruption in infrastructure using existing evidence. There is evidence that most perceptions measures appear to be very weak proxies for the actual extent of corruption in the infrastructure sector, largely (but inaccurately) measuring petty rather than grand corruption. Survey evidence is more reliable, but limited as a tool for differentiating countries in terms of access to infrastructure finance or appropriate policy models. The paper suggests that a focus on bribe payments as the indicator of the costs of corruption in infrastructure may be misplaced.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Kenny, 2009. "Measuring Corruption in Infrastructure: Evidence from Transition and Developing Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 314-332.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:45:y:2009:i:3:p:314-332
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380802265066
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Benitez & Antonio Estache & Tina Søreide, 2012. "Infrastructure policy and governance failures," CMI Working Papers 5, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    2. Robert Gillanders, 2014. "Corruption and Infrastructure at the Country and Regional Level," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(6), pages 803-819, June.
    3. Liam Wren-Lewis, 2015. "Do Infrastructure Reforms Reduce the Effect of Corruption? Theory and Evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 353-384.
    4. Breen, Michael & Gillanders, Robert, 2017. "Does Corruption Ease the Burden of Regulation? National and Subnational Evidence," MPRA Paper 82088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Gillanders, Robert & Parviainen, Sinikka, 2014. "Experts’ Perceptions versus Firms’ Experiences of Corruption and Foreign Direct Investment," MPRA Paper 58991, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Jamie Bologna, 2014. "Is the Internet an effective mechanism for reducing corruption experience? Evidence from a cross-section of countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(10), pages 687-691, July.
    7. David Aristei & Davide Castellani & Chiara Franco, 2013. "Firms’ exporting and importing activities: is there a two-way relationship?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(1), pages 55-84, March.
    8. Michael Breen & Robert Gillanders & Gemma Mcnulty & Akisato Suzuki, 2017. "Gender and Corruption in Business," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(9), pages 1486-1501, September.
    9. Estache, Antonio & Wren-Lewis, Liam, 2010. "What Anti-Corruption Policy Can Learn from Theories of Sector Regulation," CEPR Discussion Papers 8082, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Prabir De, 2010. "Governance, Institutions, and Regional Infrastructure in Asia," Governance Working Papers 22878, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    11. Collier,Paul & Kirchberger,Martina & Söderbom,Måns, 2015. "The cost of road infrastructure in low and middle income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7408, The World Bank.
    12. Antonio Estache & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2009. "Toward a Theory of Regulation for Developing Countries: Following Jean-Jacques Laffont's Lead," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(3), pages 729-770, September.
    13. Tamanna Adhikari & Michael Breen & Robert Gillanders, 2017. "Are new states more corrupt? Expert opinions vs. firms’ experiences," Working Papers 201720, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    14. Gillanders, Robert & Parviainen, Sinikka, 2015. "Corruption and the Shadow Economy at the Regional Level," MPRA Paper 64510, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Antonio Estache, 2014. "Infrastructure and Corruption: a Brief Survey," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2014-37, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    16. Gwatidzo, Tendai & Ojah, Kalu, 2014. "Firms’ debt choice in Africa: Are institutional infrastructure and non-traditional determinants important?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 152-166.

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