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Can an evolutionary approach to development predict post-war economic growth?

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  • Louis Putterman

Abstract

Might differences in levels of development prior to the era of industrialisation explain some of the dramatic differences in rates of economic growth across developing countries in recent decades? This article explores the logic behind such a conjecture, and presents evidence that it is true, using population and agrarian densities as proxies for early development. Basic growth regressions are estimated for a sample of developing countries in 1960-90, and for provinces in one country, China, in 1978-92. The robustness of the results to the inclusion of other measures, including ethnic heterogeneity and 'social capability', is also shown.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis Putterman, 2000. "Can an evolutionary approach to development predict post-war economic growth?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 1-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:36:y:2000:i:3:p:1-30
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380008422626
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Areendam Chanda & Louis Putterman, 2007. "Early Starts, Reversals and Catch-up in the Process of Economic Development," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 109(2), pages 387-413, June.
    2. Ang, James B., 2013. "Institutions and the long-run impact of early development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 1-18.
    3. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1511-1537 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Louis Putterman, 2008. "Agriculture, Diffusion and Development: Ripple Effects of the Neolithic Revolution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 729-748, November.
    5. Bockstette, Valerie & Chanda, Areendam & Putterman, Louis, 2002. "States and Markets: The Advantage of an Early Start," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 347-369, December.
    6. James B. Ang & Per G. Fredriksson, 2017. "Statehood Experience, Legal Traditions, And Climate Change Policies," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1511-1537, July.

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