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Traditional Sharing Norms as an Obstacle to Economic Growth in Tribal Societies

Author

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  • Platteau, J.P.

Abstract

This first objective of the paper is to achieve a better understanding of the values and the worldview that lead traditional tribal societies to distribute wealth and incomes in manners that are hostile to economic change. The second objective can be persued namely that of identifying ways of getting out of the vicious "traditional" equilibrium in which all change would be blocked owning to the interplay of self-erinforcing forces.

Suggested Citation

  • Platteau, J.P., 1996. "Traditional Sharing Norms as an Obstacle to Economic Growth in Tribal Societies," Papers 173, Notre-Dame de la Paix, Sciences Economiques et Sociales.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:nodapa:173
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Fafchampsm & Måns Söderbom, 2006. "Wages and Labor Management in African Manufacturing," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    2. Margherita Comola & Marcel Fafchamps, 2014. "Testing Unilateral and Bilateral Link Formation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(579), pages 954-976, September.
    3. MICHAEL R. CARTER & Marco Castillo, 2002. "The Economic Impacts of Altruism, Trust and Reciprocity: An Experimental Approach to Social Capital," Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Staff Papers 448, Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Department.
    4. Hugh-Jones, David & Perroni, Carlo, 2017. "The logic of costly punishment reversed: Expropriation of free-riders and outsiders," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 112-130.
    5. David Hugh-Jones & Carlo Perroni, 2015. "Why are heterogeneous communities inefficient? Theory, history, and an experiment," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 15-08, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    6. Robert Holzmann & Steen Jørgensen, 2001. "Social Risk Management: A New Conceptual Framework for Social Protection, and Beyond," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 8(4), pages 529-556, August.
    7. Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 1999. "Relationships and traders in Madagascar," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(6), pages 1-35.
    8. Das Gupta, Monica & Grandvoinnet, Helene & Romani, Mattia, 2000. "State-community synergies in development : laying the basis for collective action," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2439, The World Bank.
    9. Marcel Fafchamps & Flore Gubert, 2007. "Contingent Loan Repayment in the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 633-667.
    10. Ambec, S. & Treich, N., 2003. "Roscas as financial agreements to cope with social pressure," Working Papers 200301, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).
    11. Ambec, Stefan & Treich, Nicolas, 2007. "Roscas as financial agreements to cope with self-control problems," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 120-137, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HISTORICAL ANALYSIS; CULTURE;

    JEL classification:

    • B10 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - General
    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • B29 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Other

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