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Income distribution and growth in East Asia

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  • Jong-Il You

Abstract

It is widely believed that the East Asian economies performed exceptionally well not only in generating growth but also in keeping inequality low. This study tries to answer the questions raised by the claims of exceptionality of income distribution in East Asia. Central findings are that only Japan, Korea and Taiwan have legitimate claims to low inequality; that the East Asian economies distinguished themselves by their ability to translate high profit shares into high savings and investment rates; and that low inequality and high profit shares coexisted primarily due to the unusually even distribution of wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jong-Il You, 1998. "Income distribution and growth in East Asia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(6), pages 37-65.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:34:y:1998:i:6:p:37-65 DOI: 10.1080/00220389808422545
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephanie Seguino, 2000. "Accounting for Gender in Asian Economic Growth," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 27-58.
    2. Chun-Hung Lin & Peter Orazem, 2003. "Wage Inequality and Returns to Skill in Taiwan, 1978-96," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 89-108.
    3. Schiff, Maurice & Wang, Yanling, 2017. "Trade, Education, Governance and Distance: Impact on Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Asia and LAC," GLO Discussion Paper Series 72, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Francisco Garcia-Blanch, 2001. "An Empirical Inquiry into the Nature of South Korean Economic Growth," CID Working Papers 74A, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    5. Jai S. Mah, 2003. "The Restructuring in the Post-Crisis Korean Economy," Working papers 2003-46, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

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