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Earnings Inequality in Australia: Changes, Causes and Consequences

Author

Listed:
  • Borland, J.

Abstract

This paper studies the changes in earnings inequality. It also examines the causes and consequences of this changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Borland, J., 1998. "Earnings Inequality in Australia: Changes, Causes and Consequences," CEPR Discussion Papers 390, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:390
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    Cited by:

    1. Arpita Chatterjee & Aarti Singh & Tahlee Stone, 2016. "Understanding Wage Inequality in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 348-360, September.
    2. Alison L. Booth & Hiau Joo Kee, 2011. "A Long‐Run View Of The University Gender Gap In Australia," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 51(3), pages 254-276, November.
    3. Peter Dawkins, 2002. "The 'Five Economists' Plan: The Original Idea and Further Developments," CEPR Discussion Papers 450, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. David Johnson & Roger Wilkins, 2003. "The Effects of Changes in Family Composition and Employment Patterns on the Distribution of Income in Australia: 1982 to 1997-1998," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Juan D. Barón & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2010. "Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap in Private- and Public-Sector Employment: A Distributional Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 227-246, June.
    6. Yekaterina Chzhen & Karen Mumford & Catia Nicodemo, 2013. "The Gender Pay Gap in the Australian Private Sector: Is Selection Relevant Across the Earnings Distribution?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 367-381, September.
    7. George Athanasopoulos & Farshid Vahid, 2003. "Statistical Inference and Changes in Income Inequality in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(247), pages 412-424, December.
    8. Stephen Bell & John Quiggin, 2005. "Unemployment, Labour Market Insecurity and Policy Options," Australian Public Policy Program Working Papers WP2P05, Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland.
    9. Steven Kennedy & David Hedley, 2003. "A Note on Educational Attainment and Labour Force Participation in Australia," Treasury Working Papers 2003-03, The Treasury, Australian Government, revised Nov 2003.
    10. Sholeh A Maani, 2002. "Education and Maori Relative Income Levels over Time: The Mediating Effect of Occupation, Industry, Hours of Work and Locality," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/17, New Zealand Treasury.
    11. Noel Gaston, 2008. "Understanding Australian Income Inequality: The Proper Role played by Globalisation, De-unionisation and the Terms of Trade," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 15(1), pages 49-66.
    12. Jeff Borland, 2000. "Economic Explanations of Earnings Distribution Trends in the International Literature and Application to New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 00/16, New Zealand Treasury.
    13. Shahateet, Mohammed, 2006. "How Serious is Regional Economic Inequality in Jordan? Evidence from Two National Household Surveys," MPRA Paper 57118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:bla:ecorec:v:92:y:2016:i:299:p:517-547 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Shahateet, Mohammed & Al-Tayyeb, Saud, 2007. "Regional consumption inequalities in Jordan: Empirical study," MPRA Paper 57400, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    WAGES ; LABOUR ; INCOME DISTRIBUTION;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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