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Trade Openness, Structural Change and Total Factor Productivity

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  • Sohrab Abizadeh
  • Manish Pandey

Abstract

The impact of trade openness on growth of total factor productivity (TFP) is investigated. Given the differences in tradability of goods across sectors as well as the ongoing structural change, we examine whether trade openness has had a differential impact on TFP growth of the three main sectors of an economy. While the positive impact of openness on TFP growth for the aggregate economy is confirmed, openness has had no appreciable impact on the growth of TFP in the agricultural and industrial sectors. We find that the positive effect of openness on TFP growth for the economy as a whole was mostly due to the positive relationship between the two variables for the services sector. Further, we conclude that the lack of a general consensus in past studies could be due to their neglect of structural change and temporal factors when analyzing the trade-TFP nexus.

Suggested Citation

  • Sohrab Abizadeh & Manish Pandey, 2009. "Trade Openness, Structural Change and Total Factor Productivity," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 545-559.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:23:y:2009:i:4:p:545-559
    DOI: 10.1080/10168730903372273
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
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    5. Miller, Stephen M. & Upadhyay, Mukti P., 2000. "The effects of openness, trade orientation, and human capital on total factor productivity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 399-423, December.
    6. Steve Dowrick & Jane Golley, 2004. "Trade Openness and Growth: Who Benefits?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 38-56, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ibrahim, Muazu, 2020. "Effects of trade and financial integration on structural transformation in Africa: New evidence from a sample splitting approach," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 556(C).
    2. Walker, Sarah, 2012. "The (Rail)road to Structural Change: Transportation Costs, Integration, and Production Specialization," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124614, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Brinca, Pedro, 2014. "Distortions in the neoclassical growth model: A cross-country analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-19.

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    Keywords

    Trade; openness; sectors; total factor productivity;

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