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Export-Output Causality and the Role of Exports in Irish Growth: 1950-1997

  • Doyle Eleanor
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    Sources of Irish growth are examined using a recently developed Granger causality procedure with particular focus on the role of Irish exports. As augmented production function is employed where the inclusion of variables in addition to exports ensures that different impacts on exports and output are controlled for and thus, a more accurate testing of the export-led-growth hypothesis is possible. The most important sources of Irish growth are identified as the terms of trade and demand in industrial countries i.e. external sources. Bi-directional causality is found for exports and output implying a virtuous circle of growth and exports. [F1,F4]

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    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Economic Journal.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 31-54

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:15:y:2001:i:3:p:31-54
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    1. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
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    9. Shan, Jordan & Tian, Gary Gang, 1998. "Causality between Exports and Economic Growth: The Empirical Evidence from Shanghai," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(2), pages 195-202, June.
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    14. Barry, Frank & Bradley, John, 1997. "FDI and Trade: The Irish Host-Country Experience," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(445), pages 1798-1811, November.
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