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Poverty And Income Maintenance In Old Age: A Cross-National View Of Low Income Older Women / Growing Old In The Us: Gender And Income Adequacy / Gender And Aging In South Korea

  • Agneta Stark
  • Nancy Folbre
  • Lois Shaw
  • Timothy Smeeding
  • Susanna Sandstrom
  • Lois Shaw
  • Sunhwa Lee
  • Kyunghee Chung

The contributions in this Explorations section reveal differences across countries in the support systems of the elderly and shows that poverty among the elderly has not been eliminated, even in rich countries. Social insurance systems with an adequate minimum benefit do the best job of avoiding poverty among elderly women. Poverty rates among older women are much higher than for older men and much higher in the US compared to other nations in the Luxembourg Income Study. Most nonmarried elderly women in the US live alone and are heavily dependent on Social Security, while in the Republic of Korea the majority of elderly women live with children. Families provide most of the support for elderly in the Republic of Korea, including financial support and daily care when needed.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 163-197

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:11:y:2005:i:2:p:163-197
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  1. Kathleen McGarry, 2000. "Guaranteed Income: SSI and the Well-Being of the Elderly Poor," NBER Working Papers 7574, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Anders Bjorklund & Richard B. Freeman, 1997. "Generating Equality and Eliminating Poverty, the Swedish Way," NBER Chapters, in: The Welfare State in Transition: Reforming the Swedish Model, pages 33-78 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. COILE, Courtney & DIAMOND, Peter & GRUBER, Jonathan & JOUSTEN, Alain, 2000. "Delays in claiming social security benefits," CORE Discussion Papers 2000029, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. Robert Erikson & John H. Goldthorpe, 2002. "Intergenerational Inequality: A Sociological Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 31-44, Summer.
  5. Jonathan Gruber & David Wise, 2001. "An International Perspective on Policies for an Aging Society," NBER Working Papers 8103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly, 2003. "Left behind: SSI in the era of welfare reform," Working Paper Series 2003-12, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  7. Madonna Harrington Meyer & Douglas Wolf & Christine Himes, 2005. "Linking Benefits To Marital Status: Race And Social Security In The Us," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 145-162.
  8. David Card & Richard B. Freeman, 1993. "Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number card93-1, 07.
  9. Currie, Janet, 2004. "The Take-Up of Social Benefits," IZA Discussion Papers 1103, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Alicia H. Munnell, 2004. "Why Are So Many Older Women Poor?," Just the Facts jtf_10, Center for Retirement Research.
  11. Paul S. Davies & Melissa M. Favreault, 2004. "Interactions Between Social Security Reform and the Supplemental Security Income Program for the Age," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2004-02, Center for Retirement Research, revised Feb 2004.
  12. Gary V. Engelhardt & Jonathan Gruber, 2004. "Social Security and the Evolution of Elderly Poverty," NBER Working Papers 10466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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