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The decomposition of US and Euro area stock and bond returns and their sensitivity to economic state variables

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  • Nico Valckx

Abstract

This paper decomposes US and Euro area excess stock and bond return innovations into news factors using the Campbell-Schiller methodology. The results indicate that stock return volatility is mostly due to volatility of future excess return news. Inflation news plays a minor role although it is significantly correlated with excess return innovations. For the bond market too, it is future return news—not inflation news—that moves bond returns most. For finite investment horizons, however, asset market movements give a differential importance to the various news components. Results are comparable for the US and the Euro area, but differ in terms of magnitudes. In addition, sensitivities ('betas') to a set of state variables are estimated, yielding high interest rate betas and low money growth betas. Generally, inflation, unemployment and leading indicator betas are significant. Asset market exposures to oil and exchange rate changes are more significant for the Euro area than in the US.

Suggested Citation

  • Nico Valckx, 2004. "The decomposition of US and Euro area stock and bond returns and their sensitivity to economic state variables," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 149-173.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:eurjfi:v:10:y:2004:i:2:p:149-173
    DOI: 10.1080/1351847032000137393
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    References listed on IDEAS

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