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History of consumer demand theory 1871 - 1971: A Neo-Kantian rational reconstruction

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  • Ivan Moscati

Abstract

This paper examines the history of the neoclassical theory of consumer demand from 1871 to 1971 by bringing into play the knowledge theory of the Marburg School, a Neo-Kantian philosophical movement. The work aims to show the usefulness of a Marburg-inspired epistemology in rationalizing the development of consumer analysis and, more generally, to understand the principles that regulate the process of knowing in neoclassical economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivan Moscati, 2007. "History of consumer demand theory 1871 - 1971: A Neo-Kantian rational reconstruction," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 119-156.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:eujhet:v:14:y:2007:i:1:p:119-156
    DOI: 10.1080/09672560601168504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicola Giocoli, 2003. "Modeling Rational Agents," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2585.
    2. Moscati, Ivan, 2006. "Epistemic virtues and theory choice in economics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58429, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Luigino Bruni, 2002. "Vilfredo Pareto and the Birth of Modern Microeconomics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2238.
    4. Terence Hutchison, 2000. "On the Methodology of Economics and the Formalist Revolution," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1719.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ivan Moscati, 2012. "How cardinal utility entered economic analysis during the Ordinal RevolutionLength: 31 pages," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf1205, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
    2. Néstor Garza & Gisell Pugliese, 2009. "Elección teórica en economía: el caso de las teorías de crecimiento de Solow, Romer y Ramsey," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID, June.
    3. Giocoli, Nicola, 2011. "From Wald to Savage: homo economicus becomes a Bayesian statistician," MPRA Paper 34117, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer theory; demand theory; utility theory; Neo-Kantianism; Marburg School; systematicity;

    JEL classification:

    • B13 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Neoclassical through 1925 (Austrian, Marshallian, Walrasian, Wicksellian)
    • B21 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Microeconomics
    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory

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