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Student support and academic performance: experiences at private universities in Mexico


  • Erik Canton
  • Andreas Blom


Financial aid to students in tertiary education can contribute to human capital accumulation through two channels: increased enrollment and improved student performance. We pay particular attention to the latter channel, and study its quantitative importance in the context of a student support program from the Sociedad de Fomento a la Educacion Superior (Society for the Promotion of Higher Education) (SOFES) implemented at private universities in Mexico. Administrative data provided by SOFES are analyzed using a regression-discontinuity design. The advantage of the regression-discontinuity method is that it represents a natural experiment with randomly assigned treatment so that selection issues are minimized. The empirical results suggest that this financial aid package (loans and scholarships) contributes to better academic performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Canton & Andreas Blom, 2010. "Student support and academic performance: experiences at private universities in Mexico," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 49-65.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:18:y:2010:i:1:p:49-65 DOI: 10.1080/09645290801931766

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    Cited by:

    1. Alex Solis, 2017. "Credit Access and College Enrollment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(2), pages 562-622.


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