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The Connection Between Access to University and Net Social Welfare Expenditure in Southern Italy

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  • Giorgio Di Pietro

Abstract

This paper examines whether net social welfare expenditure did buttress participation rates in university education in the south of Italy between 1983 and 1996. This hypothesis is tested setting up an enrolment model in which net social welfare expenditure is included as one of the independent variables, using pooled regional data. Although unemployment rates among young individuals have been found to be the major determinant of enrolment rates, empirical results support the hypothesis according to which net social welfare expenditure did have a role in enhancing participation rates in university education in the south of Italy in the 1983-1996 period.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Di Pietro, 2002. "The Connection Between Access to University and Net Social Welfare Expenditure in Southern Italy," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 25-39.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:10:y:2002:i:1:p:25-39
    DOI: 10.1080/09645290110110182
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Per-Anders Edin & Bertil Holmlund, 1995. "The Swedish Wage Structure: The Rise and Fall of Solidarity Wage Policy?," NBER Chapters, in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 307-344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Shea, John, 2000. "Does parents' money matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 155-184, August.
    3. Mary Corcoran & Roger Gordon & Deborah Laren & Gary Solon, 1992. "The Association between Men's Economic Status and Their Family and Community Origins," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(4), pages 575-601.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Di Pietro, 2004. "The determinants of university dropout in Italy: a bivariate probability model with sample selection," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 187-191.
    2. Giorgio Di Pietro & Peter Urwin, 2006. "Education and skills mismatch in the Italian graduate labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 79-93.

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