IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Technology Specialization And The Magnitude And Quality Of Exports


  • Martin Andersson
  • Olof Ejermo


This paper examines how technology specialization, measured by citation-weighed patents, affects trade flows. The paper analyzes the relationship between (i) technology specialization and export specialization across regions and (ii) the technology specialization of origin and destination and the quality of export flows. We find that the export specialization of regions corresponds to their technology specialization. Regions with higher technology specialization export products of higher quality, as indicated by higher prices. Moreover, export flows to destination countries with a high technology specialization consist of products of higher quality in the specific technology. The results are consistent with knowledge and technology being important for export performance and with regions with higher specialization in a technology being better equipped to produce high-quality products. They are also consistent with destinations of higher technology specialization, having a more pronounced demand for products of higher quality in the same technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Andersson & Olof Ejermo, 2008. "Technology Specialization And The Magnitude And Quality Of Exports," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 355-375.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:17:y:2008:i:4:p:355-375 DOI: 10.1080/10438590701279714

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barros, Pedro P & Nilssen, Tore, 1999. " Industrial Policy and Firm Heterogeneity," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(4), pages 597-616, December.
    2. Miyagiwa, Kaz & Ohno, Yuka, 1997. "Strategic R&D policy and appropriability," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 125-148, February.
    3. Poyago-Theotoky, Joanna, 1996. "R&D Competition with Asymmetric Firms," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 334-342, August.
    4. Ana I. Saracho, 2002. "Patent Licensing Under Strategic Delegation," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(2), pages 225-251, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Woerter, 2009. "Technology diversification, product innovations, and technology transfer," KOF Working papers 09-221, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    2. Patrick Herron & Aashish Mehta & Cong Cao & Timothy Lenoir, 2016. "Research diversification and impact: the case of national nanoscience development," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(2), pages 629-659, November.
    3. Lugovskyy, Volodymyr & Skiba, Alexandre, 2015. "How geography affects quality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 156-180.
    4. Olof Ejermo & Karin Bergman, 2014. "Services vs. Manufacturing – How Does Foreign and Domestic Sales Impact on Their R&D?," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 367-391, September.
    5. Sara Johansson & Charlie Karlsson, 2007. "R&D accessibility and regional export diversity," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 41(3), pages 501-523, September.
    6. Rainer Walz, 2010. "Competences for green development and leapfrogging in newly industrializing countries," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 245-265, August.
    7. Chen, Jong-Rong & Chu, Yun-Peng & Ou, Yi-Pey & Yang, Chih-Hai, 2015. "R&D specialization and manufacturing productivity growth: A cross-country study," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34, pages 33-43.
    8. Domini, Giacomo, 2015. "The innovation-trade nexus: Italy in historical perspective (1861-1939)," MERIT Working Papers 055, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    9. Klimis Vogiatzoglou, 2009. "Determinants of Export Specialization in ICT Products: A Cross-Country Analysis," Working Papers 2009.3, International Network for Economic Research - INFER.
    10. Bergman, Karin & Ejermo, Olof, 2011. "Swedish Business R&D and its Export Dependence," Working Papers 2011:26, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    11. Dieter F. Kogler & Jürgen Essletzbichler & David L. Rigby, 2017. "The evolution of specialization in the EU15 knowledge space," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 345-373.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:17:y:2008:i:4:p:355-375. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.