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Differing motivations for terrorism

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  • Dirk Rubbelke

Abstract

Analysis of terrorism often means an analysis of terror organizations. In contrast, this analysis investigates individual agents' motivations to support terrorism. These motivations do not only include the aim of terrorism, but also motivations which are exclusively inherent to the individual agent's sphere. The latter can, of course, not be identified in a framework focusing on the organizational sphere of terrorism. Therefore, our approach gives new hints for the combat of terrorism. We allow for different forms of terrorism.

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Rubbelke, 2005. "Differing motivations for terrorism," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 19-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:16:y:2005:i:1:p:19-27
    DOI: 10.1080/1024269052000323524
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Atkinson, Scott E & Sandler, Todd & Tschirhart, John, 1987. "Terrorism in a Bargaining Framework," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 1-21, April.
    2. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    3. Lapan, Harvey E & Sandler, Todd, 1988. "To Bargain or Not to Bargain: That Is the Question," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 16-21, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Löschel & Dirk T.G. Rübbelke, 2009. "Impure public goods and technological interdependencies," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(6), pages 596-615, October.
    2. Elie Appelbaum, 2008. "Extremism: Root Causes and Strategic Use in Conflicts," Working Papers 2008_02, York University, Department of Economics.
    3. Elie Appelbaum & Eliakim Katz, 2007. "Political extremism in the presence of a free rider problem," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 31-40, October.
    4. Omay, Tolga & Takay Araz, Bahar & Ilalan, Deniz, 2011. "The effects of terrorist activities on foreign direct investment: nonlinear Evidence," MPRA Paper 31015, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Elie Appelbaum, 2006. "Strategic extremism," Working Papers 2006_12, York University, Department of Economics.
    6. Peren Arin, K. & Lorz, Oliver & Reich, Otto F.M. & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2011. "Exploring the dynamics between terrorism and anti-terror spending: Theory and UK-evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 189-202, February.
    7. Elie Appelbaum, 2004. "Union militancy and the probability of strikes," Working Papers 2004_4, York University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conjectures; Joint production; Terrorism;

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