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An assessment of inflation targeting in a quantitative monetary business cycle framework: evidence from four early adopters

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  • Dooyeon Cho
  • Dong-Eun Rhee

Abstract

This article examines the effectiveness of inflation targeting (IT) to stabilize the real economy in advanced countries where IT was adopted in the early 1990s. To quantitatively assess IT, this article employs the monetary business cycle accounting methodology recently developed by Šustek (2011), which is an extended version of Chari, Kehoe, and McGrattan (2007), to monetary models. Our main finding is that the monetary policy wedge that captures economic fluctuations caused by monetary policy has significantly declined since the implementation of IT in the early 1990s. The results suggest that advanced economies, such as Australia, Canada, Sweden and the United Kingdom, that adopted IT in the early 1990s have been successful in stabilizing business cycle fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Dooyeon Cho & Dong-Eun Rhee, 2015. "An assessment of inflation targeting in a quantitative monetary business cycle framework: evidence from four early adopters," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(32), pages 3395-3413, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:47:y:2015:i:32:p:3395-3413
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2015.1016206
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    References listed on IDEAS

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