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Does democracy affect environmental quality in developing countries?

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  • B. Mak Arvin
  • Byron Lew

Abstract

This article examines the impact of democracy on environmental conditions in a large sample of developing countries for the period 1976-2003. This relationship is explored empirically using three indicators of environmental quality: carbon dioxide emissions, water pollution and deforestation damage. We find evidence that democracy is conducive to environmental improvement but that this result depends on the measure of the environmental quality that is used. We also find remarkable differences in results across our different sub-samples. The conclusion therefore is that there is no uniform relationship between democracy and the state of the environment.

Suggested Citation

  • B. Mak Arvin & Byron Lew, 2009. "Does democracy affect environmental quality in developing countries?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(9), pages 1151-1160.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:43:y:2009:i:9:p:1151-1160
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840802600277
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 2005. "Is Trade Good or Bad for the Environment? Sorting Out the Causality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 85-91, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fredriksson, Per G. & Neumayer, Eric, 2013. "Democracy and climate change policies: Is history important?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 11-19.
    2. Hanna Krings, 2014. "Environmental Aspects of Resource Extraction Contracts," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201434, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    3. Danny García Callejas, 2015. "Voting for the environment: the importance of Democracy and education in Latin America," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL CARIBE 014782, UNIVERSIDAD DEL NORTE.
    4. repec:cup:endeec:v:22:y:2017:i:05:p:624-647_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Galinato, Gregmar I. & Islam, Asif, 2017. "The challenge of addressing consumption pollutants with fiscal policy," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(05), pages 624-647, October.
    6. Y.H. Farzin & C.A. Bond, 2012. "Unbundling Technology Adoption and tfp at the Firm Level. Do Intangibles Matter?," Working Papers 2012.97, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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