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Corporate tax rates and foreign direct investment in the United States

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  • Albert Wijeweera
  • Brian Dollery
  • Don Clark

Abstract

A significant research effort has been directed at establishing the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI), with taxation policy identified as an important factor. However, the empirical literature has been limited in several respects, with most work focused exclusively on host country tax regimes. This paper seeks to extend the boundaries of FDI empirical inquiry by using a panel of nine investing tax exemption and tax credit countries over the period 1982-2000, constituting more than 85% of total US FDI inflows, and incorporating home country tax rates to analyse two as yet unanswered questions. First, are corporate income tax rates an important determinant of FDI in the US? Secondly, do investors from tax credit countries differ significantly in their tax response relative to those from tax exemption countries?

Suggested Citation

  • Albert Wijeweera & Brian Dollery & Don Clark, 2007. "Corporate tax rates and foreign direct investment in the United States," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 109-117.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:1:p:109-117 DOI: 10.1080/00036840500447872
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon, Roger H. & Hines, James Jr, 2002. "International taxation," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 28, pages 1935-1995 Elsevier.
    2. Jason Cummins & R. Glenn Hubbard, 1995. "The Tax Sensitivity of Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from Firm-Level Panel Data," NBER Chapters,in: The Effects of Taxation on Multinational Corporations, pages 123-152 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Chandana Chakraborty & Parantap Basu, 2002. "Foreign direct investment and growth in India: a cointegration approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(9), pages 1061-1073.
    4. de Mooij, Ruud A & Ederveen, Sjef, 2003. "Taxation and Foreign Direct Investment: A Synthesis of Empirical Research," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(6), pages 673-693, November.
    5. Joel B. Slemrod, 1990. "Tax Effects on Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Evidence from a Cross-Country Comparison," NBER Chapters,in: Taxation in the Global Economy, pages 79-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Michael P. Devereux & Rachel Griffith & Alexander Klemm, 2002. "Corporate income tax reforms and international tax competition," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(35), pages 449-495, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lars P. Feld & Jost H. Heckemeyer, 2011. "Fdi And Taxation: A Meta‐Study," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(2), pages 233-272, April.
    2. Overesch, Michael, 2007. "The Effects of Multinationals? Profit Shifting Activities on Real Investments," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-071, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Lourdes Jerez Barroso, 2011. "Base imponible y neutralidad del Impuesto de Sociedades: alternativas y experiencias," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 197(2), pages 113-146, June.
    4. Xie, En & Reddy, K.S. & Liang, Jie, 2017. "Country-specific determinants of cross-border mergers and acquisitions: A comprehensive review and future research directions," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 127-183.

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