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The NBA and the influx of international basketball players

Author

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  • Erick Eschker
  • Stephen Perez
  • Mark Siegler

Abstract

The determinants of salaries for professional athletes in the National Basketball Association (NBA) are examined to investigate how international athletes have fared relative to athletes trained in the United States. It is found that international basketball players were paid a large premium above other players of similar skills and characteristics for the 1996-97 and 1997-98 seasons, after which the premium disappeared. This temporary premium is likely attributable to a 'winner's curse' experienced by NBA teams before investing significant resources in scouting and evaluating international players.

Suggested Citation

  • Erick Eschker & Stephen Perez & Mark Siegler, 2004. "The NBA and the influx of international basketball players," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(10), pages 1009-1020.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:10:p:1009-1020
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000246713
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kahn, Lawrence M & Sherer, Peter D, 1988. "Racial Differences in Professional Basketball Players' Compensation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 40-61, January.
    2. J. Richard Hill & Peter A. Groothuis, 2001. "The New NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement, the Median Voter Model, and a Robin Hood Rent Redistribution," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 2(2), pages 131-144, May.
    3. Mark Gius & Donn Johnson, 1998. "An empirical investigation of wage discrimination in professional basketball," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(11), pages 703-705.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hisahiro Naito & Yu Takagi, 2016. "Is Racial Salary Discrimination Disappearing in the NBA? Evidence from Data during 1985-2015," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2016-001, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    2. Igan, Deniz & Pinheiro, Marcelo & Smith, John, 2015. "A study of a market anomaly: “White Men Can’t Jump”, but would you bet on it?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 13-25.
    3. Hisahiro Naito & Yu Takagi, 2017. "Is there A Positive Association between Increasing Salary Discrimination in the NBA and Unshrinking Racial Income Gap of White and Black Citizens ?," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2017-001, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    4. Ryan M. Rodenberg & Jun Woo Kim, 2011. "Precocity and labor market outcomes: Evidence from professional basketball," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2185-2190.
    5. James Richard Hill & Peter A. Groothuis, 2015. "Are Findings of Salary Discrimination Against Foreign-Born Players in the NBA Robust?," Working Papers 15-13, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University, revised 2015.
    6. Rodenberg Ryan & Kim Jun Woo, 2012. "Testing the On-Court Efficacy of the NBA's Age Eligibility Rule," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-23, June.
    7. Rodney Fort & Young Hoon Lee, 2007. "Structural Change, Competitive Balance, And The Rest Of The Major Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 519-532, July.
    8. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:1091-1103 is not listed on IDEAS

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