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Human capital and international knowledge spillovers in TFP growth of a sample of developing countries: an exploration of alternative approaches

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  • Hans-Jurgen Engelbrecht

Abstract

This study tests and compares the two major approaches to the modelling of human capital in growth regressions, i.e. the Lucas and the Nelson-Phelps approach, in the context of developing country models with international knowledge spillovers. On balance, the results seem to favour the Nelson-Phelps approach. Using human capital stock variables instead of flow variables, a positive role for human capital in the absorption of international knowledge spillovers other than embodied R&D spillovers is confirmed. The results suggest the importance of distinguishing between different types of international knowledge spillovers, as well as between different human capital sub-categories.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans-Jurgen Engelbrecht, 2002. "Human capital and international knowledge spillovers in TFP growth of a sample of developing countries: an exploration of alternative approaches," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(7), pages 831-841.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:7:p:831-841
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840110061947
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keller, Wolfgang, 2000. "Do Trade Patterns and Technology Flows Affect Productivity Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 17-47, January.
    2. Keller, W., 1997. "Trade Patterns, Technology Flows, and Productivity Growth," Working papers 9701, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    3. Frank Lichtenberg & Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 1996. "International R&D Spillovers: A Re-Examination," NBER Working Papers 5668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Where has all the education gone?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1581, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neil Foster-McGregor & Johannes Pöschl, 2016. "Productivity effects of knowledge transfers through labour mobility," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 169-184, December.
    2. Raffaello Bronzini & Paolo Piselli, 2006. "Determinants of long-run regional productivity: the role of R&D, human capital and public infrastructure," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 597, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Uppenberg, Kristian, 2010. "The knowledge economy in Europe," EIB Economic Surveys, European Investment Bank, number 1, January.
    4. Md. Rabiul Islam & James B. Ang & Jakob B. Madsen, 2014. "Quality-Adjusted Human Capital And Productivity Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(2), pages 757-777, April.
    5. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2011. "Econometrics For Grumblers: A New Look At The Literature On Cross‐Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 109-155, February.
    6. Mercedes Gumbau-Albert & Joaquin Maudos, 2009. "Patents, technological inputs and spillovers among regions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(12), pages 1473-1486.
    7. Bournakis, Ioannis & Christopoulos, Dimitris & Mallick, Sushanta, 2015. "Knowledge Spillovers and Output per Worker: An Industry-level Analysis for OECD Countries," MPRA Paper 84948, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Oct 2016.
    8. Raffaello Bronzini & Paolo Piselli, 2005. "What determines productivity level in the long run? Evidence from Italians regions," ERSA conference papers ersa05p267, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Neil Foster-McGregor & Johannes Pöschl, 2009. "The Importance of Labour Mobility for Spillovers across Industries," wiiw Working Papers 58, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    10. Dulleck, Uwe & Foster, Neil, 2008. "Imported Equipment, Human Capital and Economic Growth in Developing Countries," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 233-250, September.
    11. Matthias Busse & José L. Groizard, 2008. "Technology Trade in Economic Development," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 569-592, April.
    12. repec:kap:iaecre:v:14:y:2008:i:2:p:167-180 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Robin Johnson & W. A. Razzak & Steven Stillman, 2007. "Has New Zealand benefited from its investments in research & development?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(19), pages 2425-2440.
    14. Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Natércia Fortuna, 2006. "Human capital, trade and long-run productivity. Testing the technological absorption hypothesis for the Portuguese economy, 1960-2001," FEP Working Papers 226, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    15. Yanling Wang, 2009. "Is North-South Trade-Related Technology Diffusion Regional?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(3), pages 402-412, July.
    16. Yanling Wang, 2006. "North-South Technology Diffusion: How Important Are Trade, FDI and International Telecommunications?," Carleton Economic Papers 06-01, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    17. Luis Gil-Alana & Pedro Mendi, 2005. "Fractional integration in total factor productivity: evidence from US data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(12), pages 1369-1383.

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