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Testing oligopoly power in domestic and export markets


  • Carlos Arnade
  • Daniel Pick
  • Munisamy Gopinath


Empirical applications of testing oligopoly power in different industries are based on the 'new empirical industrial organization' (NEIO) approach. Parallel to this approach, theoretical and empirical applications to testing oligopoly power in international trade have also emerged. A shortcoming of these approaches is that they do not account for the possibility that an industry, which is active in the domestic and international markets, may exhibit oligopoly power in both markets. We extend the existing models by simultaneously accounting for domestic and international components of four industries in testing for oligopoly power. We found that in some cases, industries exhibit oligopoly behaviour in either or both markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Arnade & Daniel Pick & Munisamy Gopinath, 1998. "Testing oligopoly power in domestic and export markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 753-760.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:6:p:753-760
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498325453

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Craig A. Gallet, 2006. "Health information and cigarette consumption: supply and spatial considerations," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 35-47, March.
    2. Craig A. Gallet, 2003. "Advertising and Restrictions in the Cigarette Industry: Evidence of State-by-State Variation," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(3), pages 338-348, July.
    3. Reimer, Jeffrey J. & Stiegert, Kyle W., 2006. "Evidence on Imperfect Competition and Strategic Trade Theory," Staff Paper Series 498, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.

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