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Voting with the crowd: do single issues drive partisanship?


  • Martin Bryan Schmidt


We examine whether survey data supports the anecdotal evidence which suggests that group association impacts the individual's stated beliefs. Specifically, we examine whether a rise in the relative importance of a single issue, i.e. national security, blurs the traditional importance of socio-economic variables in determining an electorate's political party association. Further, we examine whether such blurring occurs across the responses to questions outside the scope of this single issue. We find that in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, the relative importance of national security rose in the US electorate and reduced the relative importance of socio-economic variables in determining the electorate's political association for both security and nonsecurity issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Bryan Schmidt, 2013. "Voting with the crowd: do single issues drive partisanship?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(13), pages 1691-1700, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:45:y:2013:i:13:p:1691-1700
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.636022

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Binder, Michael & Pesaran, M. Hashem, 2001. "Life-cycle consumption under social interactions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(1-2), pages 35-83, January.
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    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models


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