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Does monitoring affect corruption? Career concerns and home bias in football refereeing

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Listed:
  • Bruno Rocha
  • Fábio Sanches
  • Igor Souza
  • Jos� Carlos Domingos da Silva

Abstract

This article evaluates refereeing bias in football games. Using a data set for Brazilian Championship, we find that referees systematically favour home teams setting more extra time in close matches in which home teams are behind. Career concerns seem to be relevant, since monitoring inhibits this behaviour and the effect of the refereeing bias on the probability of scoring in the extra time is quantitatively negligible.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Rocha & Fábio Sanches & Igor Souza & Jos� Carlos Domingos da Silva, 2013. "Does monitoring affect corruption? Career concerns and home bias in football refereeing," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(8), pages 728-731, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:20:y:2013:i:8:p:728-731
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2012.736938
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Dohmen & Jan Sauermann, 2016. "Referee Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(4), pages 679-695, September.
    2. Andrea Albanese & Stijn Baert & Olivier Verstraeten, 2020. "Twelve eyes see more than eight. Referee bias and the introduction of additional assistant referees in soccer," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(2), pages 1-15, February.
    3. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, Reading University.
    4. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Echoes: what happens when football is played behind closed doors?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-14, Department of Economics, Reading University.

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