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Empirical evidence on the effectiveness of environmental taxes

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  • Bruce Morley

Abstract

The aim of this study is to determine whether environmental taxes affect levels of pollution and energy consumption. Using a panel of European Union (EU) members and Norway, there is a significant negative relationship between environmental taxes and pollution, but no relationship between environmental taxes and energy consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Morley, 2012. "Empirical evidence on the effectiveness of environmental taxes," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(18), pages 1817-1820, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:19:y:2012:i:18:p:1817-1820
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2011.650324
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:rensus:v:90:y:2018:i:c:p:969-981 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tipper, Adam & Harkness, Jane, 2018. "Environmental Taxation and Expenditure in New Zealand," Working Paper Series 7627, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:7:p:2464-:d:157930 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ramón López & Amparo Palacios, 2014. "Why has Europe Become Environmentally Cleaner? Decomposing the Roles of Fiscal, Trade and Environmental Policies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 58(1), pages 91-108, May.
    5. López, Ramón & Palacios, Amparo, 2011. "Why Europe has become environmentally cleaner: Decomposing the roles of fiscal, trade and environmental policies," CEPR Discussion Papers 8551, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Francesco Crespi & Claudia Ghisetti & Francesco Quatraro, 2015. "Environmental and innovation policies for the evolution of green technologies: a survey and a test," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 5(2), pages 343-370, December.
    7. Ionel Bostan & Mihaela Onofrei & Elena-Doina Dascalu & Bogdan Fîrtescu, 2016. "Impact of Sustainable Environmental Expenditures Policy on Air Pollution Reduction, During European Integration Framework," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 18(42), pages 286-286, May.
    8. repec:wfo:wstudy:58131 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Francesco Crespi & Claudia Ghisetti & Francesco Quatraro, 2015. "Taxonomy of implemented policy instruments to foster the production of green technologies and improve environmental and economic performance," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 90, WWWforEurope.
    10. repec:taf:oaefxx:v:3:y:2015:i:1:p:1062634 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:eneeco:v:71:y:2018:i:c:p:370-382 is not listed on IDEAS

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